Essay 1 - Running head SOLIDARITY ANOMIE AND ALIENATION Durkheim Social Solidarity Anomie and Alienation Jean Lawrence Classical Sociological Theory AMU

Essay 1 - Running head SOLIDARITY ANOMIE AND ALIENATION...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Running head: SOLIDARITY, ANOMIE, AND ALIENATION 1 Durkheim, Social Solidarity, Anomie, and Alienation Jean Lawrence Classical Sociological Theory AMU Lori Kelley
SOLIDARITY, ANOMIE, AND ALIENATION 2 Durkheim, Social Solidarity, Anomie, and Alienation Emile Durkheim’s thesis on social solidarity was categorized by two contrasting types within The Division of Labor in Society. This interest in social solidarity looked into the ways in which a society “is held together and how its members see themselves as a part of a whole” (Ritzer, 2011, p.193). The first of the social solidarities is known as mechanical. Mechanical solidarity is a more primitive style and can be described as a society which is “triggered by primordial sensations of shared or common resemblances” (Schiermer, 2015, p.51). The contrasting and second categorization within the Division of Labor is Organic Solidarity. Unlike the collective conscience found within mechanical solidarity, organic solidarity is a society comprised of individualization or interpretation of the minds. Durkheim believed that in order for organic solidarity to exist, mechanical solidarity needed to disappear entirely. Durkheim was partially correct in the societal division in these modern times. For instance, those who live in mechanical solidarity such as Amish, Polygamists, Mormon, or Mennonites live in completely separated communities which exclude others who do not believe in their traditions and lifestyle. Even with the continued social and economic modernization that is constant throughout the United States, social solidarity takes place still in the form of Mormon solidarity (Goodsell, 2000). For the Church of Latter-Day Saints, or the Mormon Church, solidarity “became a primary facilitator for effective instrumental leadership” (Goodsell, 2000, p.137). The Mormon Church associated the term solidarity with the term community. Due to their comprehensive and egalitarian system of principles, their past communities and even some present day communities can and are considered mechanical solidarity. Though not directly associated with, many polygamist communities tie themselves with the Mormon faith.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture