Respone #13 - unworthy of love. Thinking this, he could not...

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Response #13 Tan Huy Hoang Nguyen Professor Pam O’Klock-Stein English 1B 21 January 2006 Othello by William Shakespeare Tragic flaw is the internal imperfection in the hero that brings him down. His downfall becomes his own doing, and he is no longer, as in classical tragedy, the helpless victim of fate. Some say that Othello’s tragic flaw was jealousy which flared at suspicion and rushed into action unchecked by calm common sense. A more modern interpretation would say that Othello’s tragic flaw was that he had internalized, that is taken into himself, the prejudices of those who surrounded him. In his heart he had come to believe what they believed: that a black man is an unattractive creature, not quite human,
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Unformatted text preview: unworthy of love. Thinking this, he could not believe that Desdemona could truly love him for himself. Her love must be a pretense, or a flawed and corrupted emotion. Iago hinted at these ideas, and Othello rushed to accept them, because they echoed his deepest fears and insecurities. The dramatic form of classical tragedy derives from the tragic plays of ancient Athens, which depicted the downfall of a hero or famous character of Greek legend. The hero would struggle against overwhelming fate, and his defeat would be so noble that he wins the moral victory over the forces that destroy him....
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This note was uploaded on 06/24/2008 for the course ENG 1B taught by Professor Unknown during the Winter '06 term at Miss. College.

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