Ch-01-Managing in Complex Environments-2007 December revision-30b

Ch-01-Managing in Complex Environments-2007 December revision-30b

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Managing in Complex Environments a   Robert S. Atkin Katz Graduate School of Business University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA  15260 [email protected] Chapter 1 “Managing in Complex Environments” Revised, December 2007 © 2007 Robert S. Atkin a.   Written by the author for use in the course BUSSPP0020 “Managing in Complex Environments” at the  University of Pittsburgh.   Use for other purposes or by other instructors without the author’s written  permission is prohibited under copyright laws. ©  2007   Robert S. Atkin Page   1
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Managing in Complex Environments    Lecture Notes 1: Managing in Complex Environments “If we are to win, we must be able to operate in a disorderly  environment”   1 I. Teaser A. better than your previous job at Old Navy.  Or perhaps you bought a belly-ring  at Hot Topic, a dress at Juicy Couture, or tickets at stubhub.com.  You may  have a Dell PC, an Apple iPod, or returned to T-Mobile for your cell service  after a brief fling with Vonage or Skype.  After being unhappy with Hotmail, you  now have a gmail account.  You’re still needling your parents for an XM  receiver.  Even though you have eaten more than your share of Wendy’s or  McD’s, and drop bunches at Starbucks, you’ve begun to shop at Whole Foods  or Trader Joe’s.  You certainly have watched MTV or ESPN or CNN or BET.  Maybe you bought someone a gift at Sharper Image or had a bagel at  Bruegger’s or dinner at Cheesecake Factory after shopping.      B. What do all of these business entities have in common? 1. You’ve heard of them (or most of them – if not, check their websites)  2. You’ve familiar with their products (or most of them)  3. Most are internationally visible 4. Anything else?  Your parents are older than most, maybe all, of these  companies.  In fact,  you  are older than many of these companies.  2 C. So what?  Really two points. ©  2007   Robert S. Atkin Page   2
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1. Business school is not just about getting ready for the job market or  graduate school.  It is also about getting juiced to create new products, new  brands, new jobs, and new companies. 2. Since somebody will do it,  it may as well be you. D. Hopefully, these notes will be part of a first step.  ©  2007   Robert S. Atkin Page   3
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II. Quick view of two companies  3 A. Many folks still think of Pittsburgh as a smoky steel town even though most of  the mills closed years ago.  On the other hand, most folks don’t think of it as the  home base to newer, growing, interesting firms.  But it is – and two of them are 
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This note was uploaded on 06/25/2008 for the course BUSSPP MCE taught by Professor Atkins during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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Ch-01-Managing in Complex Environments-2007 December revision-30b

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