3.4.1%20Safe%20Handling%20of%20Food%20-%20R

3.4.1%20Safe%20Handling%20of%20Food%20-%20R - handling by...

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3.4.1 Safe Handling of Food
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Foodborne Illness CDC estimates each year  76 million illnesses  325,000 hospitalizations  5000 deaths Children, pregnant women, the elderly  and those with weakened immune  systems are most at risk
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Causes of Food-borne Illness Bacteria Examples of Source Salmonella Meat, poultry, eggs, dairy, seafood, fresh  produce, chocolate, foods w/ raw eggs Clostridium (toxins) meats Listeria Soft cheeses, unpasteurized milk, deli meats,  hot dogs E. coli 0157:H7 Undercooked meat, unpasteurized milk and  fruit juice, raw vegetables, water
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Causes of Food-borne Illness Virus Examples of Source Hepatitis A Raw shellfish from polluted water; food 
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Unformatted text preview: handling by infected person Parasites Giardia Contaminated water; food handling by infected person Taenia (tapeworm) Undercooked meat or pork Commercially Prepared Food Mistakes by a food manufacturer or restaurant chef can cause a large outbreak of food-borne disease improper pasteurization undercooked food improper handling of food poor hygiene Food safety: producer to consumer on the farm food processing plant transportation grocery store/ restaurant consumer Reduce the Risk www.fsis.usda.gov Bacteria grow best between 40 o F and 140 o F (4 o C and 60 o C) www.fsis.usda.gov...
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This note was uploaded on 06/24/2008 for the course FSHN 130 taught by Professor Wood during the Spring '08 term at Washington State University .

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3.4.1%20Safe%20Handling%20of%20Food%20-%20R - handling by...

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