(10) LE Responses - Law Enforcement Response Chapter 10...

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Chapter 10 Law Enforcement Response Chapter 10
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Training Training produces victims that feel safer and treated better Seattle – specialized DV unit – provides a variety of services to victims for maximum safety as well as holding offenders accountable Investigate as though the victim will not be able to testify at trial Specialized training on domestic evidence collection Treat cases similar to stranger assault Trained on mandatory arrest and primary aggressor decision making Use lethality assessment tool 4 states have member/citizen interaction training (charm school) After citizens have complained about an officer’s conduct, they attend the 40 hour interpersonal skills training Only those identified for the training and the immediate supervisor are notified No evals of these programs
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Criminal Justice Ambivalence Historically police intervention has been unpredictable, prosecutions rare and victims reluctant to report Victims and advocates charged police/ courts with failure to protect Police responded by blaming victims for not following through Statutes forbade officers to make misdemeanor arrests unless they witnessed the crime Legal precedent discouraged them from entering homes w/o an warrant Many believed interfering caused more harm than good to the victim Each of these positions holds a kernel of truth Results are better when DV is recognized as a community problem Higher arrest rates result when police are part of a coordinated community response
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Chapter 10 The Systems Approach What happens when police pursue a preferred arrest policy but no other actions result? CJS LE Courts Corrections
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The Courts Dropped requirement that victims sign a complaint Advocates and volunteers now help victims in navigating the system Hopefully this will result in more victims following through Established no drop and evidence based prosecution (same as other crimes) No drop – encourage victims to cooperate Provide services such as counseling, housing assistance, safety planning Evidence based prosecution – assumes victim will not be available, use excited utterances (911), police testimony, medical reports, physical evidence Decisions to go forward w/o victim cooperation – based on premise that victims are trying to stay alive not failing to cooperate 3 reasons for no drop policies: 1. Removes responsibility for prosecution from victims – less likely to be targeted for intimidation 2. State has obligation to prosecute those who violate the law – to do otherwise sends the wrong message to batterers 3. State has compelling interest in prosecuting potentially dangerous DV defendants in the interest of public safety
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Davis study – do presumptive policies actually increase the rate of successful prosecution and conviction?
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(10) LE Responses - Law Enforcement Response Chapter 10...

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