kin 3513-ch 5

kin 3513-ch 5 - Chapter 5 - Motor Control Theories Concept:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 - Motor Control Theories Concept: Theories about how we control coordinated movement differ in terms of the roles of central and environmental features of a control system
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Questions we will address What motor control mechanisms enable people to perform a variety of motor skills? What are the roles of the central and peripheral nervous systems in how people control the performance of an action? How do various internal and external factors influence how people control the performance of an action? Summary: How do we successfully move in our environment?
Background image of page 2
What is “Motor Control”? Schmidt and Lee (1999) An area of study dealing with the understanding of the neural, physical, and behavioral aspects of movement
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Why Study Motor Control Theory? What is a “theory”? Hawking (1996) states that a theory should: accurately describe a large class of observations make definite predictions about the results of future observations
Background image of page 4
What is Motor Control Theory? Behavioral emphasis Used to describe the control processes of human movement without going into the neural level features of the control process Describe human behavior by making observations and measurements
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relevance of Motor Control Theory Provides the practitioner with a base of support on which to develop effective skill instruction and practice environments See Fig. 5.1, p. 82 Knowledge of theory distinguishes the “professional” from the “technician” “Evidence based practice”
Background image of page 6
Definitions of Important Terms Coordination Body & Limbs Movement Pattern Events in the Environment In terms of an action: “The patterning of head, body and limb movements relative to the patterning of environmental objects and events.” [ Turvey, 1990 ] [ textbook, p. 83 ] In terms of movements during an action: The pattern of body and limb movements at a specific point in time while performing an action
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Coordination Cont. Patterns of movt. Not limited to skilled performers Refers how the different aspects of the body relate to one another at a specific point in time Environmental objects and events Looks at the context in which the skill is performed How does the environment shape the movement Regulatory conditions
Background image of page 8
Definitions of Important Terms ( cont .) Degrees of freedom (df) = the independent components of a complex system (muscles, joints) Degrees of freedom problem = How does the nervous system control the many df of limbs and joints to enable a person to perform an action as intended? Robot, driving example Class exercise
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Degrees of freedom cont. Freeing Body segments are allowed to move freely Freezing Body segments are locked/frozen or moved in a ridged fashion Easier to control, less degrees of freedom Depends on demands of the task and skill level of the performer Child vs. adult Playing piano, chopping wood, shooting a free-throw
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 50

kin 3513-ch 5 - Chapter 5 - Motor Control Theories Concept:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online