Lesson 4 - Lesson 4 Plant Nutrition and Defense Soil Highly weathered outer layer of the Earths crust o Mixture of sand rocks clay slit humus mineral

Lesson 4 - Lesson 4 Plant Nutrition and Defense Soil Highly...

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Lesson 4: Plant Nutrition and Defense Soil Highly weathered outer layer of the Earth’s crust o Mixture of sand, rocks, clay, slit, humus, mineral, and organic matter The Earth’s crust includes an estimated 92 naturally occurring elements o Most are found in the form of inorganic compounds called minerals Plants Depend on Soil Topsoil o the most organic rich o Worms and other creatures love this layer Subsoil o Nutrients that have washed off from rocks o Less organic Bedrock o Water moves laterally Water and Mineral Availability About half of the soil volume is occupied by pores o May be filled with air or water or both Hydrogen bonds adhere water to soil particles and dissolve nutrients Soil needs the right balance of sand, silt and clay
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Soil composition can determine the relative proportions of air and water in soil spaces Soils with high sand drain quickly Soils with silt do not drain well therefore have little air Most plants like a mix Macro and Microelements Most basic nutrients are elements LEARN Macro elements: plant nutrients required in relatively large amounts Microelements : plant nutrients required in relatively small amounts Chlorine= Cl=Closed Manganese=Mn=Monday Molybdenum=Mo=Morning Copper=Cu=See u Zinc=Zn=Zoon
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Macronutrients Micronutrients
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Extracting Nutrients from the Soil Minerals must be in solution Important examples: o Nitrate: NO 3- o Potassium: K + Anions dissolve in soil water and are readily available to plants for uptake by roots Loss of nutrients by water is called leaching and can have a harmful effect on soil fertility
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