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Ch14-15 Vocab - Federico Nusymowicz Period 4 Reform in...

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Federico Nusymowicz 10/31/06 Period 4 Reform in Early 19 th Century America ID Second Great Awakening: the Great Revival was the second great religious revival in United States history and consisted of several kinds of activity, distinguished by locale and expression of religious commitment. Ralph Waldo Emerson: an American author, poet, and philosopher. Transcendentalism. Charles G. Finney: often called "America's foremost revivalist," was a major leader of the Second Great Awakening in America that had a profound impact on the history of the United States. Salvation by faith. John Humphrey Noyes: an American utopian socialist. He founded the Oneida Community in 1848. New Harmony: Shakers: an offshoot of the Religious Society of Friends (or Quakers ), originated in Manchester, England in the late eighteenth century (1772). Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers maintained their numbers through conversion and adoption. Brook Farm: a transcendentalist Utopian experiment, was put into practice by transcendentalist former Unitarian minister George Ripley at a farm in West Roxbury, Massachusetts, at that time nine miles from Boston. Louis Agassiz: Swiss-born American zoologist, glaciologist, and geologist, the husband of educator Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz, and one of the first world-class American scientists. Stuided fish. Gilbert Stuart: an American painter. Kinda copied Copley’s style. John J. Audubon: a Franco-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. He painted, catalogued, and described the birds of North America. Washington Irving: an American author of the early 19th century. He is perhaps best known for his short stories, his most famous being "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip van Winkle".
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