Phonetics and phonology

Phonetics and phonology - Phonetics Consonants Vowels...

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Phonetics Consonants Vowels “shun” Spelling: -tion -sion -cean -sian IPA: International Phonetic Alphabet (not international phonetic association in this sense)- one symbol represent only one sound. Memorizes the handout to be given on Thursday Two things to consider: The mouth The tongue Voicing : if vocal cords are vibrating it is voiced. Voiceless is when you don’t feel vibration. If you’re whispering you should really have voicing. Where your tongue is in relationship to your mouth. Place of articulation. Alveolar ridge is behind the teeth when making “t” as in “top.” also “n”, “j”, “l”, “z”. These are called alveolars. On or between you teeth. “th” sound. The dental or interdental. Labials are your lips and lip sounds like “p”, “b”, “m”. Sounds make with labials and dentals are labial dental like “f”. Labials are hardest for ventriloquists. Palet and velum. Sounds when things touch your palet, its called paletals and when things touch your velum are velars (velum is soft pallet). You have an alveo-paletal region (somewhere). Glottal sound from the throat (uh oh). H is a lorengal soungs. Glottal sound (HA in surprise). In english “h” is placeless. Has no place in articulation. Manner of articulation: what is the air doing in your mouth or throat? Is it stopping completely? If it is we call it a stop/plosive . o Nasals are using the air from your nose like “m” and “n”. These are also stops. “D” is a stop sound and if you make the sound from your nose it’s an “n.” When friction is created in the air flow it is called fricatives . Sounds like “f”, “t”, “s” Liquid/approximate/glide : R, L : no stoppage or turbulence of the air, but tongue makes contact with some part of the mouth. “ Yuh ” (as in yeah) or “ Wuh ” (water) (these are labial velars.) o
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This note was uploaded on 06/25/2008 for the course LIN 306 taught by Professor Shields during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Phonetics and phonology - Phonetics Consonants Vowels...

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