Ch400Ch10LN2 - Chem 400 Intermolecular Forces From our...

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Gas •No def nite shape or volume •Very low densities •Density varies with T, P •Rapid, random motion •High kinetic energy Solid •Fixed shape •Fixed Volume •Rigid •High densities •Not compressible •No or little motion Liquid •Fixed volume •No f xed shape •High densities •Not compressible •Fluid, motion •Some kinetic energy Chem 400 Intermolecular Forces •From our discussion on bonding, you should realize that CO 2 is a nonpolar molecule. •Now is CO 2 naturally a solid at room temp? •No, at room temperature it is a gas, and you can see the solid CO 2 turning into CO 2 gas as I speak. •So why is CO 2 a gas at room temperature, while H 2 O is a liquid at room temperature, and sucrose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ) is a solid at room temperature? •What determines what phase or state a compound will exist in at room temperature? •To answer this, let’s f rst review the 3 states o± matter. •So what determines whether a compound is a solid, liquid, or a gas at room temperature? •The strength o± the attractions between molecules: the stronger the attraction, the more likely it will be a solid, while the weaker the attractions, the more likely it will be a gas. •These attractive ±orces “glue” solids or liquids together.
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What’s the force or “glue” that holds molecules together as liquids or solids?
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This note was uploaded on 06/25/2008 for the course CHEM 400-401 taught by Professor Dr.samples during the Fall '06 term at American River.

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Ch400Ch10LN2 - Chem 400 Intermolecular Forces From our...

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