Race Episode 3 Handout - PHIL 420 Social and Political...

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PHIL 420 Social and Political Philosophy Student Name: Yusur Alsalihi Race: The Power of an Illusion Viewing Episode III “The House We Live in” 1.Who was allowed to become a naturalized citizen before 1954 and who wasn’t? What rights and privileges do citizens have that non-citizens don't have? What were the consequences for those denied citizenship? become naturalized citizens.” After the end of the Civil War, congress approved of the measure to account persons of African descent as able to gain neutralization. However African- Americans did not have the same rights as the white citizen thus, every racial minority tried to gain the status of a ‘white citizen.’ This is due to the privileges the white citizen possessed. These privileges include voting, trial by jury of their own peers, ability to hold public office and better jobs. Although African Americans had citizenship status, Jim Crow laws prevented them from such privileges. The status of ‘white’ could not be based on color alone, even when scientific evidence showed the Caucasian race included Mediterranean and Indian individuals, the court failed to recognize them as equal to the white man. The court stated that, “white is not something that can be scientifically determined, but white is something that is subjectively understood.” Thus, the title of ‘white citizen’ was based on arbitrary terms. Jews, Italians, and Anglo Saxon Protestants were not seen as white. However, when compared to the African American or the Latinx individual they were “more white” than those marginalized groups. In 1922, when Japanese American Takao Ozawa petitioned the Supreme Court for naturalization, the Japanese community believed this was the chance to gain neutralization. Unfortunately, the supreme court ruled against neutralization, and Japanese citizens were labeled as, “aliens ineligible for citizenship.” This had a negative effect on Japanese farmers who were unable to purchase or even lease land. Japanese land was taken from these Japanese immigrants and sold to white farmers.

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