{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

C401Ch13LN3 - Ch 13 Chemical Equilibrium Part 3 Le...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ch 13: Chemical Equilibrium Part 3 Le Châtelier’s Principle Let's go back to the Haber process: N 2 ( g ) + 3H 2 ( g ) ± 2NH 3 ( g ) As the pressure increases, the amount of ammonia present at equilibrium increases. As the temperature increases, the amount of ammonia at equilibrium decreases. Can this be predicted? Or, in other words, what happens when we mess with an equilibrium system? Le Châtelier’s principle : If a system at equilibrium is disturbed (by a change in temperature, a change in pressure, or a change in the concentration of one or more components), the system will shift its equilibrium position in order to relieve or minimize the disturbance. The system will reach a new equilibrium. Simplistically, you can think of this as meaning that, for every action, there is an opposite reaction. Change in Reactant or Product Concentration If a chemical system is at equilibrium and we add or remove a product or reactant which is written in the K expression, the reaction will shift the opposite direction to reestablish equilibrium. For example: N 2 ( g ) + 3H 2 ( g ) ± 2NH 3 ( g ) If H 2 is added while the system is at equilibrium, Q < K . The system must respond to counteract the added H 2 (by Le Châtelier’s principle).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}