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munbot - SIR THOMAS MUN[1571-1641 ON HOW TO IMPROVE THE...

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Unformatted text preview: SIR THOMAS MUN [1571-1641] ON HOW TO IMPROVE THE ENGLISH BALANCE OF TRADE "1. First, although this Realm be already exceeding rich by nature, yet might it be much encreased by laying the waste grounds (which are infinite) into such employments as should no way hinder the present revenues of other manured lands, but hereby to supply to our selves and prevent the importations of Hemp, Flax, Cordage and Tobacco.... which we now fetch from strangers to our great impoverishing." "2. We may likewise diminish our importations, ifwe would soberly refrain from excessive consumption of foreign wares in our diet and rayment, with such often change of fashions as is used, so much the more to encrease the waste and charge; which vices at this present are more notorious amongst us than in former ages..." "3. In our exportations we must not only regard our own superfluities, but also we must consider our neighbours necessities, that so upon the wares which they cannot want, not yet be furnished thereof elsewhere, we may ...gain so much of the manufactures as we can, and also endeavour to sell them dear, so far forth as the high prices cause not a less vent in the quantity. But the superfluity of our commodities which strangers use, and may also have the same from other Nations, or may abate their vent by the use of some such like wares from other places, and with little inconvenience, we must strive to sell as cheap as possible we can... " "4. The value of our exportations likewise may be much advanced when we perform it our selves in our own Ships...And although it is true that the commerce ought to be free to strangers to bring in and carry out at their pleasure, yet nevertheless in many places the exportation of victuals and munition are either prohibited, or at least limited to be done only by the people and Shipping of those places where they abound." "5. ...if in our rayment we will be prodigal, yet let this be done with our own materials and manufactures....where the excess of the rich may be the employment of the poor, whose labours...would be more profitable for the Commonwealth, if they were done to the use of strangers." - "6. The Fishing in his Majesties seas of England, Scotland and Ireland is our national wealth, and would cost nothing but labour, which the Dutch bestow willingly, and thereby draw yearly a very great profit to themselves by serving many places inChristendom with our Fish..." "7. A Staple or Magazin for forraign Corn, Indico, Spices, Raw-silks, Cotton wool or any other commodity whatsoever, to be imported will encrease Shipping, Trade, Treasure, and the Kings customes, by exporting them again where need shall require..." "8. Also wee ought to esteem and cherish those trades which we have in remote or far Conntreys..." "9. It would be very beneficial to export money as well as wares..." "10. It were policie and profit for the State to suffer manufactures of forraign Materials to be exported custome- free....and it would...canse the more forraign Materials to be brought in, to the improvement of His Majesty's Customes.“ "11. It is needful also not to charge the native commodities with too great customes, lest by indearing them to the strangers use, it hinder their vent. And especially forraign wares brought in to be transported again should be favored...But the Consumption of such forraign wares in the Realm may be the more charged..." "12. Lastly, in all things we must endeavour to make the most we can of our own, whether it be Natural or Artificial; And forasmuch as the people which live by the Arts are far more than they who are masters of the fruits, we ought the more carefully to maintain those endeavours of the multitude, in whom doth consist the greatest strength and riches both of King and Kingdom: for where the people are many, and the arts are good, there the traffique must be great and the Conntrey rich....For Iron our in the Mines is no great worth, when it is compared with the employment and advantage it yields being digged, tried, transported, sold, cast into Ordnance, Muskets and many other instruments of war for otfence and defence, wrought into Anchors, bolts, spikes, nayles and the like, for the use of Ships, Houses, Carts, Coaches, Ploughs, and other instruments for Tillage." flprJleconMflmunprop] ...
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