Holocaust.Night - Night and the Loss of Faith Among...

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Night and the Loss of Faith Among Holocaust survivors, religion and the belief of a higher being was a guiding force for enduring the dreadfulness of life in the concentration camps. Elie Wiesel experienced a range of religious positions during his imprisonment and his struggle to maintain his faith is a prevalent theme in his memoir, Night. His plight with conviction progresses through essential stages, leading to an ultimate recommitment. Beginning as a devout Jew, Elie modifies his belief as he undergoes the affliction of Buna. It is his stay in the concentration camp that acts as a catalyst for his alteration in devotion. Wiesel begins his memoir by describing an awkward man called Moché the Beadle who is the first to force Wiesel to question his faith. When asked why he prays, Elie responds, “Why did I pray? A strange question. Why did I live? Why did I breathe? ‘I don’t know why,’ I said, even more disturbed and ill at ease. ‘I don’t know why.’” (Wiesel 13). A product of his education in Jewish mysticism, Elie’s faith was grounded by a belief that
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This note was uploaded on 06/26/2008 for the course RCCORE 100 taught by Professor Greenspan during the Fall '07 term at University of Michigan.

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Holocaust.Night - Night and the Loss of Faith Among...

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