Wealth - Three American Perspectives on Wealth Andrew...

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Three American Perspectives on Wealth Andrew Carnegie Booker T. Washington Andrew Golden Horatio Alger Mr. Gruskin AP U.S. History 12 April 2007
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Andrew Golden Mr. Gruskin AP U.S. History 12 April 2007 Three American Perspectives on Wealth During the late nineteenth century and the Industrial revolution, people were making money and the American Dream was becoming the ideal for which to strive for Americans and immigrants. Many varying perspectives and opinions on the effects and use of the wealth during this time developed. Three highly significant figures during this time were the fantastic and philanthropic Andrew Carnegie, and his “rags to riches” success story and climb to fortune, Booker T. Washington, and his financial support for education in the South, and the brilliant dime novel writer, Horatio Alger, whose stories about “rags to riches” and poor boys who create great lives for themselves, were all among the prominent faces in the late nineteenth century when it came to wealth and its uses and dispersing. Andrew Carnegie is known for building one of the most powerful and influential corporations in United States history and amassing one of the largest fortunes in the world, at the time, and in the end, giving away roughly three hundred and twenty four million, six hundred fifty seven thousand, three hundred ninety nine dollars worth of it to fund over three thousand libraries, schools, and universities in his homeland of Scotland, the home of his fortune, America, and around the rest of the world, even purchasing and dispersing over seven thousand church organs. The amount of money distributes by Carnegie in comparison to the value of a dollar today, values nearly four and one half
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billion dollars, which is very, very impressive. Andrew Carnegie, born in November of 1835, is America’s most prominent example of a “rags to riches” story. As a Scottish- American industrialist, businessman, a major and widely respected philanthropist, Carnegie founded the Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. When Carnegie was young, his father was fired from his job when the industrial revolution boom came around and replaced with a machine, which was more efficient and cheaper than hired labor. Carnegie was forced to America and took his family along, in search of a new life and the American dream. Carnegie, himself, found work as a bobbin boy and telegrapher, and earned only one dollar and twenty cents per week at his first job. Who would have known that the same boy would grow to be a multimillionaire by his thirties. With a strong ambition, a pleasant personality, and a devotion to both hard work and self-
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Wealth - Three American Perspectives on Wealth Andrew...

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