{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Outlines final project eg 3

Outlines final project eg 3 - I Introduction a Overview of...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: I. Introduction a. Overview of child devel b. Problems associated with poverty opment/impressionable nature of adolescence II, Body a. Parenting Differences between classes 1. Middle class families a. Concerted cultivation 2. Working class families a. Natural Parenting 3. Compare/Contrast styles b. How parenting differences affect children 1. Expectations & Outcomes aacademic 1. insert table and discuss b. extracurricular c. social d. physical health 6. mental health 3. Compare/Contrast the expectations and the outcomes 0. Second Demographic Transition Theory as an explanation I. Desire for improved standard of living 2. Increased value put on individual autonomy of adults 3. Advanced consumerism 4. Higher quality demand of relationships d. Consequences of the parentin ' 1. different trajectories a. two distinct paths in opposite directions b. vicious cycle c. widening gap d. insert graphs and discuss 2. the detrimental impact of this phenomenon III. Conclusion a. What is the next step? 1. strengthening community institutions 2. educating parents W‘fiw Pin [9H Ian: W90 Wit; SOURCE: US. Census Bureau, Cu rrent Population Survey, 1981 to 2004 Annual Social and Economic Supplements. lamb-l" ”.3 better in school -the data also show that those expected to perform better in school actually do ~between parenting (based on socxoeconomic status) and academic performance «.6 F moan. 0.0.. 0.0 0.0m 0.09 0.vw v.00 ...0.. 0.00.. 005.5. .003 0.0m 0.00 0.3. 0.09 0.00 0.00 0.1. 0.09 000.3. 5300 0.0.. v.00 fimm 0.09 000 0.00 v.09 0.09 0059 .8322 0.00 9.00 :1. 0.09 0 00 0.00 0.0.. 0.00.. 0N0.N.. $005.02 85230 .8 00.03. v.5 0+0 F.0N 0.09 va 0.00 0.0.. 0.09 900.0 95500095 .050 0.0.. 0.0 0.00 0.09 0.00 0.00 v.9 0.09 000.5 0E9. mama 0.0m n00 0.: 0.00.. 0.0m 0.00 0.... 0.09 «00.? 0:6: 0:30 2:5... 0.0.. 0. 90 0.90 0.00.. new 50 0.0m 0.00.. 09... 03.009 .0: 0800.... ...0N 0.00 0.0P 0.09 0.0 0.00 0.0 0.00.. 000.3. 520.: .o >to>oa .0 .0023 00m 0.0.. 3.0 0.0m 0.00.. 0..VN 0.00 9.0.. 0.00.. 0000.. >tm>oa .0 0:00.00 009 o. 00.. 0.0m _. .00 0.0.. 0.09 v.00 0.00 m 0.. 0.00.. 000.00 .m>m. 5.050 o>onm .o :0 0.9 0.00 v.00 0.00.. 0.5. 0.00 0.00 0.09 3.5.; .26. 5.900 30.00 530 Egon. 0.9 0.0 0.90 0.00.. new .0 0.0m 0.09 00v; 0230». .o: 088:. 0.00 0.00 0.0.. 0.009 va 0.0 0.0 0.09 9me .m>o 0:0 000.3. 0.0.. 0.00 0.00 0.00.. 0.00 0.00 9.3 0.09 000.3 001% 0. 000.00 00. :0 03 0.09 tmm .30 0.: 0.02 000.0. 08.3 o. 80.; N: 0.90 0.5 0.09 0.0m 0.0 000 0.09 090.: 000.5395 0E8... 2.55”. 25:05. m8. K .3“: 8.2.5 5.. 2.256920 0.00 :0 000 0.09 0.0m o 3.8 Sum £309 . 8.2.3: o. .30 Ban 00.0.9. 05 002.8 00.59. .25 0008000 :90 $0.. 00080.3 was. $0.2 8.32.36 .52. . 32:8 a; 2.5 9.5;. E28 .96. 8:83.00 5.59.56 E850. 2.20 .o. 2:03 .098 .90. 02.8300 00:332.. c. 93:52 0000 _.... .0303. ”0.00 mmmwfim .0530. .9 m>a>> .7”..ch 0009 00036.50 E900... 00m 9:00:10 >350 .2350 25ch 0.3 “02:00 000m H03:50.... 95 029.0030... ”—0 3:0..38.mc0l23> 0F 595 00.2.20 :05. .3.— 8029... .0 2.003ng 3:003:60 .30 203. m .6 N mama. c9: . ..o:choz meo Etcwo 3.330 8.20 33:00 E 553965. oucuEamm :Szoaoaoz cm” :8 .23 gauge . Sauna. m w.m=oo 3cm Emaufl. 56:5 .3 26:308ch @526: man 03:00 30:8 mc_c._m= new £3.60 5:830 :93 83 5.2323 202 202 5.35% 28.. . 9623 =5, 36 92.5 228 .22 8:838 cotanEmfi 35905 S 23:32 moom .2 ”mamaq H2mm. 3331553.: .Nr m>m>> 6:9; mm? .coameoEmm Emaoi ucm mEooE .6 $25 .323 mzmcmo .0: 6053 Sam 52:53 and 5.02330: 3 8:m.§u§u=0:2ma> 3 Etc: 56:5 :2; .8 9:23. .0 acoamfiaxm 3205333 .30 032. who F mama m. : mmm.m 3 Son 3 0.8.0 Oh. “and 2N mac 2: 83 m9 mmod $25 0: m8.“ E; 8? ,m Yo B; 0mm 2% 0mm owed 3w 2.3 N? 80.x :58 0.9 03,5 9m 8% 3. 99m mam 33 3m 83 02 9.3 vi 8?, “8263 mm mood v9 mace 90 Q3 9mm had 02 92‘ mom 8% QNF 83 58532 35231 .0 :23: as m: 9: 8m to awn new 03 9mm m: 3 ME. w? m: 2:38:25 350 m9 v86 NS Emu 3 one.“ Ch 5 fie v. 5 83 2: v8.0 om 83 2:2 25m 3 03.2 on $99 3 80.2 in 8}: v.2 08.? mg 03.8 3: R; 28; 830 2:5... NR v8 «.3 uvm S omm v.8 mmm 3N cum 3 «mm v.» own 3:82 .o: 2:85 3 98.! mg 52: ma 3an Sn 8:: Q R $12 New 8t! 93 max? .29; 8 €38 .6 28.8 com a: m2...“ N? «86 90 83 van :3 new 9% m9 8% m? 53 3.2882028 8’ 22: 3 v8.2 mm 892 3. 03.2 0% 212 tum Ba? v.8 v8.2 0.3 3%? .22 3.98 38m 3 :0 3; 80m 02 93“ 3 meme m3 and 0mm 33 2: 80m 3 mm? .95. E28 32mm 338m Egon NR 3% 3; n3” hm omm «8 98 2m 9% 3 3m 3 own 8:82 .o: 9:85 as $3 3 wood on Sod row 33 o. R mmmd 3mm «35 m9 5% 33 2.5 8mg 9m 25. g 83. on :3 com 82. m. E on: 0.2 2: m: 23. 82a 2 25.8 ow? mam 0.3 an; «.0 33 m. 3 wood 3m 3% 02 ~35 N: 8% egg 2 08.5. 2; Sad 3F 8nd 3 806 NS. mama «mm 83. .3; 83 ms mmmd 8m. 5 .85 2:00.... .55."... 25:02 .30... 032588ch v,o_. monN babe" . c3220 .23 53 B Egan. 325:: E8. .30... E0.» 28 D. 39 t 39.. .waw 5>m Q 2855 B 1:ch 960 t. 39 Ema :20 23 E. 89 9mm :80 S memos—o 00:5 8539: E 23E32 moon .5 839% ”2mm mwmsom 6525 .Nr m>w>> $ch 89 .=o_fia_uemn. Emaoi new oEooE B $2.6 535m mzwcuo .mj beam Bowman. c£__...o=choz «was .938 $350 320 35:8 5 cs=8°§z 3:33am 5.80.302 umuc.. Imam 50>w 03:208sz E098 .80... Ema t oamw 9&0 52¢ 2mm :29. 2mm :20 Saw 2. SN? Bum 52$ 2 none” .25 .m>w Q mus. a v9? .9 .96 Q 2005» 3 . . :20 : 3320 EEO 8:839: E 23:32 meow .: 5303‘ .6ng ammufim 6525 6 $25 535m 2650 w: “830m 5m .6 3052522 2533 65 £3 A2343; 3.5 .6 288...... 83cm. 88 $8 «.220 < .32". ruwmmmxm . . "L.,mega>mizammm an»; .: r2422, .1 “America’s Children 2005”. US. Cen 2004 Annual Social and Econ <http://www.childstats.gov/a sus Bureau, Current Population Survey, 1981 to omic Supplements. mericaschildren/eco l .asp> Bluestone, Cheryl and Catherine S. Tamis-LeMonda. “Correlates of Parenting Styles in Predominantly Workgin— and Middle-Cclass Afiican American Mothers”. Journal ofMaITiage and the Family, Vol. 61, No. 4 (Nov., 1999), pp. 881-893 Brooks-Gum, Jeanne and Lisa B. Markham. “The Contribution of Parenting to Ethnic and Racial Gaps in School Readiness” . The Future of Children, Vol. 15, No. 1, School Readiness: Closing Racial and Ethnic Gaps. (Spring, 2005), pp. 139-168 Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay and L Reasonable Expectations”. Welfare Reform. (Winter- aura D. Pittman, “Welfare Reform 3 nd Parenting: The Future of Children, Vol. 12, No. 1, Children and Spring, 2002), pp. 166-185 Glasgow, Kristan L., Sanfor M. Domb , , 'nberg, Philip L. Ritter. “Parenting Styles, Adolescents’ Attributions, and Educational Outcomes in Nine Heterogeneous High Schools”. Child Development, Vol. 68, No. 3 (Jun, 1997), pp. 507—529 Children”. Peaboabz Journal of Education Vol. 71, No. pp. 747- 776 Mcleod, Jane D. and Michael J Shanahan. “Poverty, Parenting, and Childre n’s Mental Health”. American Sociological Review, Vol. 58, No. 3 (Jun, 1993 ), pp. 351-366 Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne, Sandra K. Pope, and Robert H. Bradley. Parenting Behaviors in Young Mothers”. Family Relations. 1996), pp. 273-281 “Patterns of Vol. 45, No. 3 (Jul, Zaslow, Martha J. and Carol A. Emi g, “When Low Income Mothers Go To Work: Implications for Children”. 77w Future of Childre n, Vol. 7, No. 1, Welfare to Work. (Spring, 1997). Pp. 110-115 INVISIBLE INEQUALITY 2 ANNETTE LAREAU of social class. however. I n recent decades, sociological knowledge Pointing to a “thin evidentiary base" for about inequality in family life has in— claims of social class differences in the ‘ creased dramatically. Yet, debate persists, rim of family life, Kingston also assert especially about the transmission of class “class distinguishes neither distin advantages to children. Kingston (2000) and parenting styles or distinctive involv others question whether disparate aspects of of kids” in specific behaviors (p. 134). family life cohere in meaningful patterns. One problem with many studies is that Direct correspondence to Annette Lareau, Be at the mfluence Of parents' education on par ' partment of Sociology. 756 Gladfelter Hall. ____ .. Temple University, Philadelphia. PA 19122 Weininger, and Julia Wrigley made he] (annette.lareau0temple.edu). An early version of gestions, as did the ASR reviewers. For this arncle was issued as a working paper by the I thank the Spencer Foundation, Sloan Center for Working Families. University of Cali~ tion. ASA/NSF Grants for the Discipline. fornia. Berkeley. lbenefited from audience com— Grant-in-Aid. and Southern Illinois Univ pful sug- funding. ments on earlier drafts presented at the American am indebted to the project's research assistants. Sociological Association annual meeting in 2000. particularly Wendi Starr Brown. Gillian Johns, the University of California (Berkeley. Davis. Caitlin Howley-Rowe, Greg Seaton. and Mary and San Diego). University of Chicago, Univer- Woods. all of whose field notes appear in the ar- sity of Pennsylvania, and Temple University. ticle. I thank Nikki Johnson who assisted in pro- Patrieia Berhau. Anita Garey. Karen Hanson, duction of the manuscript, and M. Katherine Erin McNamara Honat. Sam Kaplan, Michele Mooney for editorial assistance. Errors are my Lamont. Karen Shirley. Barrie Thorne. Elliot responsibility. AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL szm. 2002. VOL. 67 (Germain—776) 747 “amuwwmmgmflmars-h . , ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern