CSOC 202 - Syllabus 2015 - CSOC 202 Sociology of Popular...

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Page 1 of 8 Course Outline – CSOC 202 CSOC 202 – Sociology of Popular Culture Section BA0: Spring/Summer May 4-June 17, 2015 Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 9:30am - 12:30pm Location: KHE 321C INSTRUCTOR:JOEY BROOKE JAKOB INSTRUCTOR E-MAIL: [email protected] COURSE PREREQUISITES: None OFFICE HOURS: The Chang School Office Hours: 12:30-1:00pm, in KHE 321C immediately following class Monday to Thursday – 8:15am – 6:45pm Friday – 8:15am – 4:30pm Saturday – 8:30am – 12:00pm (closed Saturdays June 13 to Sept 5 inclusive) I will normally reply to E-mail within 24-48 hours. E-mail is best used for administrative details. To discuss ideas and the substance of lectures, assignments, or tests, please meet with me in person during office hours. Every effort will be made to manage the course as stated. However, adjustments may be necessary at the discretion of the instructor, which would be discussed in the class prior to implementation. It is the responsibility of students to ensure that they understand the University’s policies and procedures, in particular those relating to course management and academic integrity. A list of relevant policies is included below in this outline. COURSE DESCRIPTION, OBJECTIVES and LEARNING OUTCOMES:Having an interest in popular culture is not to be simply concerned with trivial, passing fads or gossip. Instead, such an interest reflects a concern for that which makes us relatable as humans, and in this way, is deeply connected with ‘sociology’, or the study of human behaviour, experience, and roles. Something that is ‘popular’ is comprised of elements that are easily understood by viewers, listeners, or readers because the contents therein describe common—if not entirely based upon recurrent themes or tropes—characteristics or details about people. Even if the accounts are fictional, these pieces of culture are thus ‘social’ because of the manner in which they reflect back to us shared experiences, allowing us to gain a better understanding about cultural products, human communication, and social interaction. The course is designed to enable you to use key sociological concepts and theories in order to critically examine a variety of pop cultural topics and media, both past and present. By the end of the course you will have a robust set of sociologically based critical thinking tools with which to use when considering a variety of pop cultural forms. Using general subject areas and theories that organize sociological research, you will explore a wide array of popular media, including film, music, television, advertising, and social media, though additional forms may be consulted or used.
Page 2 of 8 Course Outline – CSOC 202 TEXTBOOKSA. Pomerance and Sakeris (eds.),Popping Culture(Seventh Edition), Pearson Education, 2013B. Cragun, Cragun and Konieczny. Introduction to Sociology, Wikibooks.org, 2012. Available at: ADDITIONAL MATERIAL or GUIDES:Supplementary readings: both listed here and additional material will also be distributed via Blackboard.

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