psych126finalpaper

psych126finalpaper - Smoking Body Image 1 Running head:...

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Smoking Body Image 1 1Running head: SMOKING AND BODY IMAGE PERCEPTION The Relationship of Cigarette Smoking and Perceived Body Image Satisfaction Young Hee Kim University of California, Los Angeles
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Smoking Body Image 2 Abstract This study examined if there was an association between the numbers of cigarettes smoked and perceived body-image satisfaction as well as whether smokers or non-smokers had higher body- image satisfaction. The 34 participants were undergraduate students. They took a group- administered questionnaire that included demographic questions and body-image satisfaction related statements with a rating scale. The hypothesis predicted that higher numbers of cigarettes smoked associated with lower body-image satisfaction and that smokers would have lower body- image satisfaction than non-smokers. Statistical analysis revealed no significant correlation and no significant results for the t-test between smokers and non-smokers. The results suggest that smoking and body-image satisfaction is not associated. Further research using a more representative sample and with more controls could be beneficial.
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Smoking Body Image 3 The Relationship of Cigarette Smoking and Perceived Body Image Satisfaction Public health problems have been increasing in prevalence. It is important to detect these problems early on in life to prevent them from becoming more severe. Therefore, adolescents and young adults have been a popular target group by researchers for treatment and intervention programs for these public health problems. Two of the most significant and widely researched health problems in adolescents are tobacco abuse, such as cigarette smoking, and distorted body image, such as eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Increasing awareness of the co-occurrence of eating disorder symptoms (such as body- image dissatisfaction) and substance abuse (such as cigarette smoking) has encouraged research examining the association between these two variables. Many believe that smoking helps to control their weight and so much research has focused on the relationship between cigarette smoking and eating-disorder attitudes. Hinson, Nhean, Mase, and McKee (2006) studied the relationship between restrained eating behavior and media portrayals of idealized body image, like those used in tobacco advertising, in smokers. The study found that female young adult smokers who were also restricted eaters were more susceptible to believing and expecting that smoking helps control their weight after being shown pictures of idealized bodies. These findings indicate that smoking and eating disorder pathology have some relationship. Abood, Black, and Granner (2002) examined the relationship between eating disorder pathology and the use of cigarettes. The study found that with higher body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness, the use of cigarettes linearly increased. These findings suggest a direction of the association between the two constructs: that eating disorder pathology increases and smoking increases. Although both
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2008 for the course PSYCH 126 taught by Professor Jessica(ta) during the Summer '07 term at UCLA.

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psych126finalpaper - Smoking Body Image 1 Running head:...

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