Experiment 14 - Determining IA and IIA Group Metal Ions in...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Determining IA and IIA Group Metal Ions in a Water Sample Brennan French Amy Ballard 007 02/13/2017
Introduction This experiment aims to determine the levels of Na+, K+, Li+, Ca+2, Ba2+, Sr2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ions in the Columbia River sample. When Group 1 and 2 metal ions are found in water samples it contributes to water salinity, which at high levels can cause aquatic life to die. Is the level of Cu2+and Fe3+ions in the water sample too toxic for fish life? This experiment is important because salinity helps us understand the health of a water body, and what animal and plant species we expect to find there. Some animals tolerate changes in salinity well, and are found in both freshwater and salt water. Others are healthy only when living within a certain range of salinity. The main reason that salinity is important is because of its impact on density. Warm water is less dense, and fresh water is less dense, and cold water is heavier, and salty water is heavier. Therefore, temperature and salinity can be used to calculate the density of the water and that plays a part in the hydrologic cycle. To perform this experiment we will need to use a couple of techniques that measure the absorbance rate as well as the emission spectra of certain metal ions in an aqueous solution. Detecting Group IA and IIA metal ions in aqueous solutions can be done by looking at the emission spectra utilizing the MeasureNet spectrophotometer. Emission spectroscopy is usually used to determine the concentration of different ions in a colorless aqueous solution. In emission spectroscopy, the intensity and

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture