The Hobbit Essay word - 1 J.R.R Tolkiens The Hobbit A True Fairy-Story Michael Pagliuso 1807504 English 103(OP2 March 18th 2014 Dr R Lakowski One could

The Hobbit Essay word - 1 J.R.R Tolkiens The Hobbit A True...

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1J.R.R. Tolkiens The Hobbit: A True Fairy-StoryMichael Pagliuso, 1807504English 103 (OP2)March 18th 2014Dr. R LakowskiOne could argue that J.R.R. Tolkiens novel The Hobbitmeets the criteria for many dif-ferent literary genres: childrens story, escapist fiction, early pioneer in the fantasy genre etc.
2However, the single category that The Hobbitmost certainly satisfies is that of the fairy-story,which is outlined meticulously by Tolkien in his essay On Fairy-Stories.Tolkien undoubtedlypractices what he preaches when it comes to The Hobbitmeeting the criteria to be classified as afairy-story. In his essay, he also calls attention to the fact that such stories are not strictly in-tended to satisfy the needs of children, a statement which agrees with the narrators treatment ofthe child audience reading The Hobbit.The first guideline Tolkien establishes to classify fairy-stories is the dismissal of fairiestraditional description as “‘supernatural beings of diminutive size, in popular belief supposed topossess magical powers and to have great influence for good or evil over the affairs of man,’”(Tolkien, On Fairy-Stories, 110). Instead, he equates them to be quite the opposite of the afore-mentioned description; particularly, that they are larger than the little creatures that come to mindwhen the word fairy is mentioned. This turns out to be the case in regards to the fairies featuredin The Hobbit. The fairies in the novel (hobbits, goblins, elves, dwarves, etc.) are far from bear-ing any resemblance to J.M. Barries Tinker Bell, an ideal example of the diminutive fairy.” Thisquote made by the narrator of The Hobbitclearly states that the fairies appearing in the novel arenot of the diminutive fairy class: I suppose hobbits need some description nowadays, since they have become rare and shy of the Big People, as they call us. They are (or were) a little people, about half ourheight, and smaller than the bearded dwarves. Hobbits have no beards. There is little orno magic about them except the ordinary everyday sort which helps them to disappear qui-etly and quickly when large stupid folk like you and me come blundering along,making a noise like elephants which they can hear a mile off. (Tolkien, The Hob-bit,4)Tolkiens description of his hobbits does well to distinguish his fairies as true to fairy-storyguidelines.
3Another example of Tolkien following his structure for a fairy-story is the use of the land

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