finalreview - John Clarks Five Stages of Modernity in...

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John Clark’s Five Stages of Modernity in Neotraditional Art o 1890 Dialogue with Tradition Traditions are what people are told they should value. “Tradition” has become more the term for a mapping of procedure of currently motivated taste than for any actual historical flow of values mapped by specified art objects. o 1895 Imposition of Externals Subjects or techniques external to a painting discourse’s notion of its own past no longer serve as mere reference in a dialogue with it; rather, they radically interpose Shunso, Widow and her Son o 1905 Overthrow Conventions Tagore, Bharat Mata o 1920s Artist’s Personality Choosing between nihonga and tradition, they had to decide o 1920s Extreme Formalism Bathhouse Girl , Bakusen The painting becomes the subject, through technique it can criticize itself “The use of the word ‘traditional’ to characterize artworks often involves the ideological self-definition of works by, or on behalf of, a social group who are instrumentally bound to legitimize their own stereotyping of the past.” John Clark, “The Formation of the Neotraditional p.71 o Clark is discussing the issue of “traditional” which can be construed by the self-defining society who wishes to “claim community with or domain over” something. Traditions are what people are told they should value. “Tradition” has become more the term for a mapping of procedure of currently motivated taste than for any actual historical flow of values mapped by specified art objects. Miriam Wattles, “The 1909 Ryuto and the Aesthetics of Affectivity” o Taikan, Yokoyama – Ryuto [1909]: Ryuto ’s portrayal of three Indian women in peach-toned aris against a golden ground on the banks of the Ganges reworked a theme he had painted five years earlier, soon after his return from a six-month visit to India. Nor was Taikan the only artist to be inspired by India. More than merely a personal artistic turning point for Taikan, it its fusion of genres and styles Ryuto marks the inception of a new minor genre in Japanese official art. Its secularization of Buddhistic themes precipitated the creation of a pan-asianist genre….In its ambiguity, Ryuto reconciled the perceived dichotomies of East versus West and tradition versus modernity. Through its Indian subject, it asserted a Japanese Asia. o Tagore, Abanindranath – Dewali [1903?]: The woman in this image is holing a lantern for the Indian Dewali festival, and may have served for Taikan’s inspiration for an Indian floating lantern ceremony as seen in Ryuto . The work is not clearly dated, however “the haziness of the moro technique in the background suggests contact with Taikan. Later Abanindranath was proud to claim a Japanese influence, and moro because his signature style.” Hishida Shunsô, Widow and her son [1895] o “Commemorates the loss of a husband through a widow’s nostalgic attachment to her dead warrior’s armor, almost as a keepsake, as she embraces their child. The painting is set in a past
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This note was uploaded on 06/29/2008 for the course ART HIS 150 taught by Professor Winther during the Winter '08 term at UC Irvine.

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finalreview - John Clarks Five Stages of Modernity in...

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