lec07_08_fixpriority1 - Priority-Driven Scheduling of...

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1 Priority-Driven Scheduling of Periodic Tasks (1) - Chapter 6 - Overview • Reference Model Assumptions • Fixed-priority vs. Dynamic Priority •RM – schedulable utilization bound – time demand analysis •ED F – schedulable utilization bound – time demand analysis – The stability problem of EDF
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2 Periodic Task Model • A periodic task T i is characterized by – phase: θ i –Pe r iod : p i – Execution time : e i – Relative deadline: D i from the beginning of the period. J 11 θ 1 d 11 θ 1 +p 1 d 12 θ 1 +2*p 1 d 13 θ 1 +3*p 1 J 12 J 13 Default assumption: D i = p i . That is, a periodic task deadline is located at the end of the period 0 (Power On) Assumptions • the tasks are independent – for resource contention, Chapter 8 • there are no aperiodic and sporadic tasks – for integrated scheduling, Chapter 7 • other assumptions – can be preempted at any time – context switch overhead is negligible
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3 Classification of Scheduling Algorithms (Review) offline schedule online schedule Clock-driven WRR Priority-driven (Work conserving) fixed-priority (e.g., RM, DM) dynamic-priority (e.g., EDF, LST, FIFO, LIFO) clairvoyant schedule Priority vs. Criticality” • Priority: priority is the order we execute ready jobs. • Criticality (Importance): represents the penalty if a task misses a deadline (one of its jobs misses a deadline). • Quiz: Which task should have higher priority? • Task 1: The most import task in the system: if it does not get done, catastrophic consequences will occur • Task 2: An mp3 player: if it does not get done in time, the played song will have a glitch
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4 “Priority vs. Criticality” • An important find in real-time computing theory is that importance may or may not correspond to scheduling priority . • In the following example, giving the less important task higher priority results in both tasks meeting their deadlines. • Importance matters only when tasks cannot be scheduled (overload condition), not when they can be scheduled. Important job Less important job Dynamic Priority vs. Fixed Priority •{ T 1 =(p 1 =10, e 1 =4), T 2 =(p 2 =15, e 2 =8), T 3 =(p 3 =30, e 3 =2)} Fixed Priority Schedule (RM) Miss! 01 0 2 0 3 0 Dynamic Priority Schedule (EDF) OK ! 0 2 0 3 0
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5 What are advantages of priority- driven schedule over clock-driven? • Scheduling decision is made online, and hence flexible – Jobs of a task doesn’t need to be released at the fixed time (exact periodic) • period = minimum inter-release time – Tasks can dynamically enter and leave the system • Good! BTW, how can we validate the timing behavior? – Predictability: can we say the system is schedulable a priori? – Fortunately, we have sound theory on the schedulability of priority-driven schedule OK, Let’s study such theory - Is it enough to simply memorize important theorems? - Facts – “RM is optimal” – “DM is optimal” – “The system is schedulable if U < n(2 1/n -1) according to RM schedule” – “EDF is optimal” – “The system is schedulable if U < 1 according to EDF schedule” Not that useful!
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This note was uploaded on 07/02/2008 for the course COMPUTER S 664 taught by Professor Leechangkyu during the Spring '08 term at Korea University.

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lec07_08_fixpriority1 - Priority-Driven Scheduling of...

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