History 144- Hiroshima_Bomb - Brendan Mooney Professor Clark Final Paper The Second World War was a war of the like the world had never seen Most

History 144- Hiroshima_Bomb - Brendan Mooney Professor...

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Brendan Mooney Professor Clark Final Paper 12/17/14 The Second World War was a war of the like the world had never seen. Most historians considered World War II as the only total world war as it involved almost every country on the Earth in one way or another. Rationing of food, economic struggles, and or the complete destructions of cities around the globe made this war the most devastating in recorded history. In addition to the civilian hardships; there were millions of military casualties that occurred and people went from zealous patriots to peace seeking enthusiasts. After years of suffering, ending this war was paramount in the mind of most people in the world. The Manhattan Project set out to do just that and hopefully limit the amount of human causalities and bring this gruesome war to an end. This top-secret project is responsible for much more than the creation of the first atomic bomb, it also introduced the threat of nuclear war. A wise man once said, “With great power comes great responsibility” –Voltaire. President Truman had this great power nearing the end of WWII, as we all know he chose to drop an atomic bomb on the cities Hiroshima, and later Nagasaki in the hope that the Japanese would surrender. Harry Truman made the correct decision in dropping the bomb; it spared millions of soldier’s lives and brought a quick close to the suffering and pain of World War II. On August 6 th 1945, the United States dropped a 16-kiloton atomic bomb that they nicknamed “Little Boy” on Hiroshima. Three days later “Fat Man” was dropped on Nagasaki. A little more than three weeks after the bombs had dropped, Japan finally surrendered. There were many contributing factors in making the decision to drop “ The Bomb “ but I believe the main
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reason that convinced Truman was the amount of human lives it spared. The United States had only two options to end the war. They could launch a land invasion on the Japanese mainland or drop the weapon of mass destruction and hope for a Japanese surrender. Many have argued that the dropping of the bomb was not justified, as a land invasion would have been more humane. Military land invasion do not necessarily targeted civilian lives. Yes, innocent lives were ended because of the bomb, but the land invasion would have registered civilian causalities as well. As in any war, collateral damage can never be avoided. Prior to a land invasion, bombs would have been dropped to soften up the beachheads and landing sites. The accuracy of the bombs in 1945 was not even close to the accuracy of the bombs today. Many civilians would have died during this period. Then there were the Japanese nationals who had a live or die-trying attitude. Not only would these folks need to be dealt with but also the collateral damage surrounding these civilians would have been immense. A fight to the very end with the Japanese would have claimed many more lives than an atomic bomb blast. Even Emperor
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  • Fall '16
  • Gregory Peek
  • World War II, japan, Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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