Canterbury tales

Canterbury tales - The Canterbury Tales In Chaucer's...

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The Canterbury Tales In Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, He develops into the characteristics of the church officials like The Monk, Friar, Prioress, Pardoner and Parson. Chaucer’s argument maybe is that the church is not a holy institution. He does this by looking at their devotion, honesty, and passion for the church and the common man. Only the Parson stays loyal to the church while the others deviate from the traditional role. The church it self was a fragile institution hence the deviated church officials. The Monk and the Prioress are huge religious figures. The Monk lives in a monastery while the Prioress sleeps in a convent. The monk enjoys hunting and riding horses which are commonly thought of as upper-class and weren’t expected of a religious figure. The prioress acts like a noble or a civilian which religious figures don’t do. Both seem to prefer the noble live over the religious life. Which make’s one wonder how did they get the job? The Pardoner is the evilest between all the evil officials. The Pardoner doesn’t
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This note was uploaded on 07/05/2008 for the course WRT 101 taught by Professor Tousey during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Canterbury tales - The Canterbury Tales In Chaucer's...

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