soc -- emotions

soc -- emotions - Emotions Definitions Sentiments - "A...

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Emotions
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Definitions Sentiments - “A feeling that has been given meaning by society” (Rohall, Milkie, and Lucas 2007: 258) In other words, “a socially constructed combination of autonomic responses, expressive behaviors, and shared meanings usually organized around another person” (Stets 2003: 309) “For example, love is a sentiment that is characterized by autonomic symptoms such as the flow of adrenaline and increased heart rate, emerges with another we see as attractive, and may be expressed in gazing and smiling at the other” (Stets 2003: 309)
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Definitions Emotions are similar to sentiments Emotions – “[have] four interconnected components: (1) situational cues, (2) physiological changes, (3) expressive gestures, and (4) an emotion label that names the specific configuration of components” (Stets 2003: 309-310)
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Definitions Situational cues – “Element of emotion that tells when and what emotion is appropriate in a given social interaction Physiological changes – “Element of emotion referring to the changes in our body that reflect the emotion in a given situation” (Rohall, Milkie, and Lucas 2007: 277-278)
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Definitions Expressive Gestures – “Element of an emotion referring to the indications we give of the emotion we are experiencing” Emotion label – “Element of emotion referring to the terms we use to label our feelings” Not all components will necessarily operate at the same time (Rohall, Milkie, and Lucas 2007: 277)
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Definitions “While persons experience particular biological responses (including autonomic, chemical, and neural activity), it is an object or event (situational cue) that is interpreted in a culturally laden manner. Further, our culture influences the gestures and label we will apply to the experience” (Stets 2003: 310)
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Definitions Emotion See a bear (interpret it as dangerous) Note the physical sensations Label the experience fear Jane Stets (2003) argues that the terms sentiments and emotions can be used interchangeably
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Definitions Affect “An evaluative compenent of an emotion” (Rohall, Milkie, and Lucas 2007: 277) “any evaluative (positive or negative) orientation toward an object” (Smith-Lovin 1995: 118 quoted in Stets 2003: 310) Cognitive aspect of emotions
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Definitions Moods – “A diffuse emotional state that lasts a relatively long period of time” (Rohall, Milkie, and Lucas 2007: 277) “affective states with out an object or without a specific object” (Frijda 1993: 381 quoted in Stets 2003: 310) “Compared to emotions, moods are usually longer in duration, lower in intensity, and more diffuse/global” (Stets 2003: 310)
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Definitions Feeling – “Internal states associated with a particular emotion” (Rohall, Milkie, and Lucas 2007: 277) “internal, subjective experience of an emotion that is unique to each person” (Stets 2003: 310)
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soc -- emotions - Emotions Definitions Sentiments - "A...

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