The Paradox of Inquiry_ recollection

The Paradox of Inquiry_ recollection - The Paradox of...

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The Paradox of Inquiry (Meno’s Paradox) The argument formulated: 1. if you know what you are looking for, inquiry is unnecessary 2. if you don’t know what you are looking for, inquiry is impossible 3. Therefore, inquiry is either unnecessary or impossible An implicit premise: Either you know what you are looking for or you don’t know what you are looking for. Evaluation 1. “You know what you are looking for.” a. You know the question you wish to answer b. You know the answer to that question By A, (2) is true, but (1) is false By B, (1) is true, but (2) is false ***There is no one sense in which both premises are true*** Is it possible for you to know what you don’t know? No: you can’t both know and not know the same thing. Yes: you can know the questions you don’t have the answers to. Recollection 1. Suppose that, in some sense, inquiry is impossible. What appears to be learning something new is really recollecting something already known. 2.
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The Paradox of Inquiry_ recollection - The Paradox of...

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