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futureofpersiangulfoil

futureofpersiangulfoil - This is yet another sample of my...

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This is yet another sample of my writing from my days as an International Politics major. It centers on oil scarcity and what could serve as some feasible alternatives to our oil supply dilemma. Alternatives to Persian Gulf Oil It is an undeniable fact that the future of Middle East relations with the rest of the world is “inextricably intertwined with petroleum.” (CQ Press, 2005) Not only will the United States’ demand for oil increase exponentially in the decades to come, but developing countries are also finding that their demands for oil have been increasing – and will continue to increase – at possibly an even faster rate. Due to the increase in economic growth in recent years in Less Developed Countries, there has been an even greater increase in the demand for energy. A perfect example is China. The economy of the People’s Republic of China has been growing by at least eight percent every year, and so, China has begun trading globally; this is due mostly to its need for resources, namely oil. (Luft, 2004) In fact, “since 2001, China’s oil use has jumped 36 percent.” (Samuelson, 2004) China’s oil imports over the next twenty years are expected to grow by an astonishing 960 percent. (Luft, 2004) It is this relationship of global oil trade that connects many nations to the Middle East – or more specifically, the Persian Gulf region. Therefore, it is very worrying when academics and policymakers assert that Persian Gulf oil will not meet the growing global demands for energy in the future. Geoffrey Kemp and Robert E. Harkavy, authors of Strategic Geography and the Changing Middle East , note that world demand for energy will reach its highest in the years to come, with an increase of 34% to 46% by 2010. The world demand for oil in particular will increase from 70 million barrels a day in 1995 to between 92 and 97 1
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million barrels a day by 2010. (Kemp, 1997) This rapid influx in demand for Persian Gulf oil is in no way offset by its supply. Though about two thirds of the world’s oil and one third of its natural gas reserves are controlled by the Persian Gulf states, this is still not enough to meet the ever-increasing global demand for energy.
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