Karen_Horney

Karen_Horney - Karen Horney 1 Karen Horney Ashley Hahn...

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Karen Horney Ashley Hahn Psychology 202 December 7, 2006 Karen Horney 1
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Introduction There are many women psychologists that have made an important contribution in psychology. However, they seem to not get a lot of credit for what they did. One very important psychologist who was not well recognized was Karen Horney. Gilman states that she was “among the most influential psychoanalysts of the ‘second generation’ (after Sigmund Frued)” (Gilman, 2001). Throughout this essay you will read about her childhood, her adult years, and her amazing contributions she made to psychology. Karen’s life Karen Wackels Danielson was born on September 16, 1885, in Blankenese, which is a small town near Hamburg, Germany. She was the second child of Clotilde and Berndt Wackels Danielson, who had 5 other children also. Karen’s childhood was very depressing for her, at age nine she fell in love with her own brother, Berndt, but he ended up rejecting her and this led her to her first bout with depression. Another traumatic experience was when her mother divorced her father and left her and her brother Berndt with him. In 1906 Karen entered medical school, which during that time it was not common for a women to enter medical school, and met her future husband Oskar Horney. Oscar and Karen married in 1909 and in 1910 she gave birth to her first daughter Brigitte, who was the first of three daughters. In 1911 she received her M.D. degree in Berlin and started to train in analysis. The next traumatic incident that Karen experienced was in 1911 when her mother passed away. After all of these traumatic experiences in Karen’s life she decided to enter psychoanalysis. As she was in the field of psychoanalysis a couple more traumatic events happened! In 1923 her husband’s Karen Horney 2
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business collapsed and he developed meningitis and in the same year her brother, Berndt, died of a pulmonary infection. After these two events, Karen became very depressed, to the point of having thoughts of suicide. In 1926 Karen and Oskar split up and in 1932 she came to the United States as the “first associate director at the Institute for Psychoanalysis in Chicago” (Gilman). She was asked to join the Institute for Psychoanalysis in Chicago by Franz Alexander, but “because of her theoretical differences she left” (Eckardt, 2006) the institute. Then in 1934 she moved to New York City, “where she had a private practice and taught at the New School for Social Research” (Gilman) and it was there where she unfolded her major theoretical works, The Neurotic Personality of Our Time (1937) and New Ways in Psychoanalysis (1939). On December 4, 1952 she died in New York. Area of psychology and major influences in psychology Her major area of psychology was neurosis, which is “any mental or emotional disorders, such as hypochondria or neurasthenia, arising from no apparent organic lesion or change and involving symptoms such as insecurity, anxiety, depression, and irrational fears, but without psychotic symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations”
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Karen_Horney - Karen Horney 1 Karen Horney Ashley Hahn...

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