3.4, US War Posters, WWII, and Rosie the Riveter - 1 Week Three 3.4 WWII and the Myth of Rosie the Riveter Well here we are at our final unit of study

3.4, US War Posters, WWII, and Rosie the Riveter - 1 Week...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

1Week Three: 3.4: WWII and the Myth of Rosie the RiveterWell, here we are at our final unit of study with a terrific True/False topic to consider: propaganda and war posters. Rosie the Riveter, an iconic figure during WWII will be a large focus for our topic this week. Be sure to read the article assigned and enjoy this final lecture.1930 time of growing concern over Fascism- totalitarian dictatorshipWWII looming- Hitler, MussoliniCounter with nationalistic viewpoints-Again public programs sponsored by government to boost patriotism and support1939-45oAllies (US, Britain, France, Poland, etc) versus Axis (Germany, Japan, Italy)oUS enters 1941, December 7, 1941 Pearl HarborOnce again- war postersMass dissemination of ideas/patriotism/informationPhilosophy and VisibilityPosters on sides of buildings, in hotel and theatre lobbiesArtists sign works- known (posters as part of art production)On fences and kiosks- public visibilityPromote patriotism at homeOptimism not seen in WWII postersReality of war doesn’t intrudeoLiberty Bonds not War BondsWWI posters don’t include the racist imagery as in WWII postersDomestic agendaHome front imageryGrows out of commercial fieldIdealism stillMotivate those at homePatriotismGibson paid expenses out of pocketGov’t only paid $13,000 for Division expensesDesigners usually got 1,000 to 10,000 a sketch before warJames Montgomery Flagg, I Want You, 1917, lithographIconic imageOriginally published as the cover for the July 6, 1916, issue of Leslie's Weekly with the title "What Are You Doing for Preparedness?"
Background image
2Went on to become--according to its creator, James Montgomery Flagg--"the most famous poster in the world." Over four million copies were printed between 1917 and 1918, as the United States entered World War I.Flagg (1877-1960) contributed forty-six works to support the war effort. Because of its overwhelming popularity, the image was later adapted for use in World War II.Flagg remarked that he had been his own model for Uncle Sam to save the modeling fee. Roosevelt was impressed and replied: "I congratulate you on your resourcefulness in saving model hire. Your method suggests Yankee forebears."Historical sources attribute the name “Uncle Sam” to a meat packer who supplied meat to thearmy during the War of 1812--Samuel (Uncle Sam) Wilson (1766-1854). Actually copied from Alfred Leete’s poster of Lord Kitchener for Britain combined with Flagg’s self portraitMeant to inspireJ Howard Miller, Rosie the Riveter, 1942Late 1942 J Howard Miller produced We Can Do It poster for Westinghouse Electric and manufacturing Company
Background image
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture