{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture 19 - Lecture 19 What's the problem Question time...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 19:  What’s the problem?  Question time:  Didn’t you go a little overboard? Last time I said in effect that the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body was a court.  This is a  bit overstated.  It looks and acts like a court in that it weighs evidence and makes judgments  based on its interpretation of a legal document, the trade treaty.  But in one crucial respect it’s not  like a court.  A court has the power to compel enforcement of its orders.  It can send the sheriff to  seize my property and sell it if I owe money, and it can seize my body if I don’t cooperate.  The  DSU has no such powers.  It does not dispose of force.  It can issue judgments, such as that the  US damaged Korean steel exporters, and order the Congress to pay damages to the Koreans and  repeal the tariff, but it can’t use force to compel compliance.  It this respect, the idea that the  ultimate power has been ceded to a world body is not correct, and this ultimate power is still  retained by the world’s different nations.  Nonetheless, if the US Congress simply refused an  order the disruption to the world trade order would be so great, and the ensuing anarchy would be  so frightening, that I don’t believe it will happen, and in fact it hasn’t happened yet.  In the steel  case, the tariff was repealed.  In the cotton case, US cotton subsidies were modified; the  Brazilians claimed the modification did not constitute a full compliance, the WTO agreed and the  issue is therefore back before the Congress. Introduction:  Globalization and contemporary politics .  The burden of the last three  lectures has been that free trade increases the wealth of the world’s economy, because it enables  the world’s productive resources to be employed more efficiently.  In fact, it increases the wealth  of the country that practices it.  There’s a tendency to respond to the protectionism of other  countries with one’s own protectionism, to “level the playing field.”  In fact, a better term for this  is cutting off your nose to spite your face.  It’s as if your neighbor burns his house down and  pollutes the atmosphere, so you decide to get even by burning your house down. But at the same time, contemporary politics have running exactly the other way.  To  recapitulate the politics of trade over the past 15 years, since the passage of NAFTA: The first  contemporary politician who tried to build a career based on opposition to free trade was Pat  Buchanan, an ultra-right winger who ran for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1992. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}