Final Class Notes

Final Class Notes - Constructions of Sexual Health: Panics...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Constructions of Sexual Health: Panics and Epidemics What is a sex panic: basic social process.  Panics are set in motion in domains other than sexuality as well.  Examples:  Boils down to: Recognition and definition: Stereotyping the villains and victims: Escalation and polarization: Simplified solutions:   The anxiety subsides leaving behind new proscriptions and a punitive social climate. Who “pays?”
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
STI/HIV  Epidemic versus Panic Discourse Discourse—how we talk about something publicly Epidemic: Panic: Numbers infected categories of people Rates of infection infected Routes of transmission Symptoms moral meaning of  Treatments infection Course/results of infection Exposure: infection ratio categories of  “innocent” victims and “dangerous” or  “dirty” infected simplistic solutions  that target specific people and groups Threat defined -  (framed and described in a particular way) Characters stereotyped -  Dangerous persons and innocent victims identified and described (already scrutinized group  and children or certain types of women or “the family” etc…) Threat escalated and oversimplified solutions proposed -  Threat is escalated and positions polarized (angels vs. devils,  us vs. them) – “are you with us or are you with the children?” Results….  Oversimplified solution enacted – if there is a problem there should be a law  Threat (awareness and discussion of it) subsides an a prohibitive social climate for all results STI Panic Discourse – see text chapter 15 Discourse – how we talk about something publicly Panic: How’d you get it? Or even better: who gave it to you? Did you deserve it? What does it mean about you now? Categories of people infected Innocent victims: non-sexual, unknowing and faithful (“I didn’t know he was cheating on me”), or “first-timers” (now  damaged goods, not through sexual contact)  Dangerous or dirty infected (sex workers, promiscuous – someone who has had more sex partners then the person  using the word promiscuous (you’ve had too many sex partners, you’ve had too much sex), bisexual – twice as  likely to bring something home, unfaithful, liars) Moral meaning of infection Tainted/dirty Predatory – if you pass the infection along Dishonest Unlovable Just plain stupid – best case scenario “I should have known…”  Simplistic solutions that target specific people and groups Stay clean – absolutes all the time
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Know the numbers Just say no (at least to certain types of people and dirty acts) Just say I do (nothing protects like a little gold ring) the rhetoric that once you say I do you never need to worry 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/09/2008 for the course SOCY 1006 taught by Professor Walden during the Fall '08 term at Colorado.

Page1 / 16

Final Class Notes - Constructions of Sexual Health: Panics...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online