Final Exam Study Guide

Final Exam Study Guide - Study Guide Final Exam Blues...

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Study Guide Final Exam: Blues: 12-bar-blues form Music: 12-bar blues formula 3-line poetic structure A A B Harmonic pattern o 4 bars - “I” (tonic) o 2 + 2 bars - “IV” OR 2 bars “IV”, 2 bars “I” o 2 + 2 bars - “V” (dominant) OR 2 bars “V”, 2 bars “I” Ma Rainey's “Counting the Blues” o Layin' in my bed this mornin' face turned to the wall (break) o Layin' in my bed this mornin' face turned to the wall (break) o Trying to count these blues so I could sing them all (break Folk blues Post-civil war Jim Crow racism and KKK Outcasts Down and out” stories, work songs, relationships Can be unaccompanied Mail order guitars, cigar-box guitars Flexible form Other accompaniment o Harmonica, washboard, washtub bass o Call and response (break) Bottleneck guitar “One chord” variety, diddley-bow Broken top of a bottle that is worn on the little finger (jagged edge is smoothed down first) Made it possible to match the sliding and wailing of the voice Urban blues (Chicago) 1910s-20s Migrant bluesmen— electrified o Amplified, faster tempos o Traditional blues subjects Robert Johnson Delta bluesman Vibrating slide of the bottleneck “Preachin’ Blues (Up Jumped the Devil)” Muddy Waters Highly influenced by gospel tradition
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Ma Rainey Minstrel/circus background Bessie Smith Identified with the sophisticated city blues tradition Minstrel tour at age 16, star of black vaudeville o Larger than life: Boogie-woogie Solo piano form with roots in the blues tradition Driving left hand plays the lower-sounding notes with a repeated pattern called an ostinato The right hand takes the higher-sounding, insistently repeating Fred Meade Lux-Lewis Boogie-woogie “Mr. Freddie Blues” Stevie Ray Vaughan Dallas, texas Conservative taste in music and progressive approach to the electric guitar Bending and bottleneck style Took advantage of pedals, switches, and levers Fusion of heavy blues style of Albert King and rock virtuosity of Jimi Hendrix Country: Carter Family Hillbilly country String band with vocals Folk and gospel music “God, mom, and home,” “morally good” “Carter scratch” Melody in guitar’s bass strings Jimmie Rodgers Father of country music Meridian, Mississippi Muleskinner blues – yodel, simple accompaniment, but a guitar solo too yodeling Bluegrass Acoustic string band sound (fiddle, mandolin, banjo, guitar, and bass) and a singing style that stresses a high-pitched, straight tone Most characteristic tempo is fast Incisive tone of the five-string banjo, played with a virtuoso technique “Nashville sound” Regular use of drums, electric bass, a background of elegantly played strings with a sound more refined than the rustic fiddle style, and the use of singers to provide an impersonal anonymous kind of vocal backup
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Wash of sound: reverberation
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This note was uploaded on 07/09/2008 for the course EMUS 2752 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '06 term at Colorado.

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Final Exam Study Guide - Study Guide Final Exam Blues...

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