(4) Survivors and Consquences

(4) Survivors and Consquences - Survivors and the...

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Survivors and the Consequences of Victimization Chapter 4
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Chapter 4 Victimology One of the earliest attempts to explain mental illness and symptoms of hysteria in women – Freud – victimized through sexual abuse Later facing professional scorn – recanted – women were not actual victims but they fantasized about such abuse Oedipal complex and penis envy Interest in the role of the victim emerged in 40s - Hans von Hentig - Emphasized the victim’s vulnerability to crime - Those most likely to be victimized - Young, female, old, mentally challenged, immigrants, minorities, dull normals, depressed, acquisitive, wanton, lonesome and heartbroken, tormentor, blocked, exempted or fighting
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Chapter 4 Benjamin Mendelsohn – father of victimology Assigned a victim responsibility rating 1. Completely innocent victim – children or unconscious 2. Victim with minor guilt – victimized bc of ignorance 3. Voluntary victim – equally guilty 4. Victim more guilty than offender - provokes 5. Victim along is guilty – killed in self defense 6. Imaginary victim – falsely accuses Victims were more likely to die at the hands of someone they knew than a stranger Precipitator was the person killed – threw first blow or escalated the violence Amir – stated that victims of forcible rape shared responsibility for their victimization Manner of dress, use of bad language, alcohol use, - unconscious expressions of her desire to be raped (1971)
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Chapter 4 The Victim Movement More recent studies have included how the CJS treats victims, the impact of victimization and effectiveness of various interventions with victims Children’s rights movement and battered women’s movements have common threads: Identification of the victims Heightened concerns over the cause of victimization Development of intervention strategies Protection and prevention efforts that are sensitive to the victims Attempts to reduce future occurrences through services and education
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Chapter 4 Equality Wheel illustrates the ultimate relationship goal of equality A model of the ideal relationships against which relationships were to be judged
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The Children’s Rights Movement Violence against children became a normal secret – privilege of parents Intervention remains inconsistent Officers seldom consider their authority to intervene in cases of battering
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Chapter 4 Child Witnessing of DV Most pervasive form of victimization today Approx 8.8 million youths have witnessed someone being shot, stabbed, sexually assaulted, physically assaulted or threatened with a weapon Strong link bt partner violence and child abuse ½ million kids are encountered by police during DV arrests Violence by husbands against wives spills over into verbal aggression towards daughters evidenced by high rates of father-daughter conflict Over ½ of women who witnessed violence bt their parents were victims of child abuse
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This note was uploaded on 06/25/2008 for the course SOCI 313 taught by Professor Spencer during the Summer '05 term at Bridgewater State University.

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(4) Survivors and Consquences - Survivors and the...

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