7.2 - 2004BBS Molecular Genetics Dr Christine Wells...

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1 2004BBS Molecular Genetics Dr Christine Wells 373557641 c.wells@griffith.edu.au Module 7: genetic analysis This lecture you will learn • Construction of genetic maps • How to calculate recombination frequency • Linkage • Calculating the probability of a combination of phenotypes • Interference
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2 How do we define a gene? The minimal segment of a chromosome that can cause a phenotype Other assumed knowledge: Complementation test (module 2 and 3) Mechanisms and consequences of recombination (module 3) Mechanisms and consequences of mutation (module 3) Building genetic maps using phenotypes Thomas Hunt Morgan’s laboratory in the early 1900’s pioneered genetic maps. Mouse and Human linkage maps followed closely. Lets revisit the principles of recombination and linkage.
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3 This is Mendel’s law of independent assortment The inheritance of trait A (eg pea colour) is independent of the inheritance of trait B (eg seed shape). Morgan and others discovered that some traits are often inherited together (eg yellow body and white eye) This is non-independent assortment.
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4 Linkage Crossing-over Linkage keeps alleles together Recombination pulls them apart Recombination frequency can be measured. (SUM of all the recombinant progeny) / (total number of progeny) Recombination frequency = number of recombinant progeny/total progeny x 100 = (8+7)/(55+53+8+7) x 100 = 15/123 x 100 =12%
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5 Linkage maps • Linkage experiments can identify genes that are physically near each other by the frequency of recombination between them. • High frequency of recombination = big
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2008 for the course GENETICS 2007 taught by Professor Gene during the Three '07 term at Griffith.

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7.2 - 2004BBS Molecular Genetics Dr Christine Wells...

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