Unit 2 IP the ethics committee by Brett Dagel

Unit 2 IP the ethics committee by Brett Dagel - Running...

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Running head: APPALACHIANS AND THE ETHICS COMMITTEE 1 Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making in Healthcare HCM641-1604A-01 Appalachians and the Ethics Committee Brett Dagel Colorado Technical University Instructor: Dr. Bridget H. Wilson
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APPALACHIANS AND THE ETHICS COMMITTEE 2 Appalachians and the Ethics Committee In order to better evaluate this situation, we should first take a closer look at the Appalachian culture and how it is greatly different from mainstream America. According to author Kathryn A. Russ (2010), the Appalachian culture is a small minority within the United States. When we speak of Appalachia, we are generally referring to the cultures that are present by the Appalachian Mountains which exist along the eastern United States. This can range from western New York, Pennsylvania, the east side of Ohio, Kentucky, the whole state of West Virginia, Tennessee, and down into Alabama and Mississippi (Russ, 2010). In 1965 there was an Act passed called the Appalachian Regional Development Act that made this a legally known area (Russ, 2010). Even within their own culture, due to the size of the area, you can see several cultural variances. Some of the Appalachians will migrate from this area to urban cities, and they are known as urban Appalachians (Russ, 2010). Whether they stay within the Appalachian area or migrate to other areas, their cultural beliefs still run strong throughout their people (Russ, 2010). This region of the United States has areas that are considered very remote. There is little that changes in the lives and beliefs of Appalachian culture. They have simple beliefs and needs such as food, shelter, transportation, and family/kin (Russ, 2010). The English they use is a form of Elizabethan English due to the remote isolation of the people (Russ, 2010). Because of this isolation they have seen little change in the way that mainstream America has adjusted the way we communicate. You will find that most of their speech will present itself in a manner that will allow for more conversation (Russ, 2010). Simple greetings and conversation are a way of showing mutual respect within their society (Russ, 2010). They will have strong ties to their
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