wolfe_1 - Relate the Radical Chic essay to previous...

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Relate the Radical Chic essay to previous discussions or lectures. What themes or contrasts persist? Any changes in the way they're presented? Any new themes? Who or what gets to stand for what, and why? In Radical Chic class is more clearly delineated and satirized than in either of the previous works. In Death of a Salesman we see Willy striving unsuccessfully to improve his family’s social stature, and there are various strategies illustrated. In Catcher in the Rye Holden is scornful of the social rules and strictures that govern upper-middle class society and the subtle differences (the right suitcases, which plays to see) that separate them from the masses. The Radical Chic story opens with the Bernstein’s “meeting” with the Black Panther’s in their thirteen room Park Avenue penthouse. There is extensive description of the opulence of their room and all the right designers and the chic people who are the upper crust of “new’ New York society, and they stand in stark contrast to the “real” Black Panthers. The entire scene reeks of the
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This note was uploaded on 07/13/2008 for the course AMST 220 taught by Professor Altschuler during the Summer '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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