Social Psych.- Chapter 4 Study Guide

Social Psych.- Chapter 4 Study Guide - 1. What are we...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
-11. What are we attempting to do when we engage in attribution? Define situational and dispositional attributions. When we engage in attribution, we are attempting to explain others’ behaviors through observation and analysis. We do this because we are trying to understand others well enough so that we can manage our lives (e.g.: why didn’t he tell me about the formal?). We look at attribution to try to understand people’s perceptions of causality, not to determine the true causes of why something actually happened. Dispositional attributions are used when we look at an individual’s internal personal characteristics, such as personality, mood, ability, and/or efforts to explain his/her behavior (e.g.: he liked someone else better and invited them instead). Situational attributions are used when we look at external factors, such as tasks, luck, or other people to explain an individual’s behavior (e.g.: he had a lot of work to do and just didn’t go to the formal). 2. Compare and contrast the types of covariation in Kelly’s covariation theory (consensus, distinctiveness, and consistency). Taking into account these 3 types of covariation, when can we make a confident attribution that a person’s behavior was caused by something dispositional? Situational? Kelly’s covariation theory states that people attribute behaviors to factors that are present when a behavior occurs and absent when the behavior doesn’t occur. (e.g.: eating at a restaurant in the commons and a waiter offers you a free dinner). Consensus covariation refers to individuals attributing behavior by examining how other people respond to the same stimulus (e.g.: is everybody else getting a free dinner? If yes, are they accepting the free dinner?). Distinctiveness covariation refers to individuals attributing a behavior by examining how the same person acts in response to other stimuli (e.g.: is he offering everybody in the restaurant a free dinner?). Consistency covariation refers to individuals attributing a behavior by examining the behavior at another time when both the person and the stimulus are the same (e.g.: does the waiter offer you a free meal only when the restaurant isn’t busy? Does he offer you one when the restaurant’s crowded?). We can make a confident attribution that a person’s behavior was caused by something dispositional when the behavior is high in consistency, but low in consensus and distinctiveness. We can make a confident attribution that a person’s behavior was caused by something
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/13/2008 for the course PSYC 31600 taught by Professor Vaughn during the Spring '08 term at Ithaca College.

Page1 / 3

Social Psych.- Chapter 4 Study Guide - 1. What are we...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online