week13 - WELCOME EF 105 Spring 2006 Week 13 Major...

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    WELCOME WELCOME EF 105                Spring 2006 Week 13
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    Major Objectives 1. Review EXCEL Problem Solving Approach LOGIC PowerPoint
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    Arithmetic Operators
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    Order of Precedence Rules Please () Excuse ^ My Dear * / Aunt Sally  + -
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    Define functions, and functions within functions The SUM function is a very commonly used math  function in Excel.  Functions have a Name and Arguments (The part within  the parentheses) A basic formula example to add up a small number of  cells is =A1+A2+A3+A4, but that method would be  cumbersome if there were 100 cells to add up.  Use Excel's SUM function to total the values in a range  of cells like this: SUM(A1:A100). You can also use functions within functions. Consider  the expression =ROUND(AVERAGE(A1:A100),1). This expression would first compute the average of all the  values from cell A1 through A100 and then round that  result to 1 digit to the right of the decimal point
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    Use relative references A relative reference is a cell reference that shifts  when you copy it to a new location on a  worksheet.  A relative reference changes in relation to the  change of location.  If you copy a formula to a cell three rows down  and five columns to the right, a relative  reference to cell B5 in the source cell would  become G8 in the destination cell. 
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    Use absolute references An absolute reference is a cell reference  that does not change when you copy the  formula to a new location.  To create an absolute reference, you  preface the column and row designations  with a dollar sign ($).  For example, the absolute reference for  B5 would be $B$5. This cell reference would stay the same no  matter where you copied the formula.
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    Use mixed references A mixed reference combines both relative and absolute  cell references.  You can effectively lock either the row or the column in a  mixed reference.  For example, in the case of $B5, the row reference would  shift, but the column reference would not  In the case of B$5, the column reference would shift, but the  row reference would not  You can switch between absolute, relative and mixed  references in the formula easily in the edit mode or on  the formula bar by selecting the cell reference in your  formula and then pressing the F4 key repeatedly to  toggle through the reference options.
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    Using the If function The arguments for the IF function are:  IF(logical_test,value_if_true,value_if_false) For example, the function =IF(A1=10,20,30) tests  whether the value in cell A1 is equal to 10 
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