Marine Tank

Marine Tank - The Biology 1A Marine Tank By Phillip Ge Fall...

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1 The Biology 1A Marine Tank By Phillip Ge · Fall 2005 UGSI for Erin Osborne Section 109 · [email protected] HOW TO USE: Use this outline to get to know the names and classifications of the animals in the marine tank as well as what they look like. Often students know the names of the animals in the marine tank but have either forgotten what they look like or have confused them with other animals. Do not use this outline to review internal features; the list of features that accompany each organism is only a partial list. Phylum Cnidaria - Two germ layers, no coelom (therefore neither a protostome nor a deuterostome), radial symmetry - Sea anemone o Filter feeding animals o Usually a solitary polyp o The cnidocytes (stinging cells with nematocysts ) serve to paralyze and capture prey, which is then moved by the tentacles into the mouth. o Digestion occurs in the gastrovascular cavity o HINTS: ± Sometimes the anemone’s tentacles might be closed unto itself. If you see something soft and plushy on the lab exam that is attached to a rock, a safe bet would to be to guess that it is probably just another anemone.
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2 ± Realize that we have a large diversity of anemones in our marine tank. Just because that big orange thing chilling in the corner is an anemone does not mean that the colony of small pink things crowded on a rock are not. ± Anemones commonly get confused with sea urchins and featherduster worms. How do I tell them apart? Anemones are not spiky like sea urchins, and anemones do not live inside hard calcified tubes like featherduster worms. Phylum Annelida - Three germ layers, coelomate ( protostome ), bilateral symmetry - Featherduster Worm (Class Polychaeta) o Suspension feeder, lives inside a hard calcium carbonate tube o If you touch the featherduster worm, it will immediately hide back into its tube.
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This note was uploaded on 07/15/2008 for the course BIO 1al taught by Professor Pederson during the Fall '08 term at Berkeley.

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Marine Tank - The Biology 1A Marine Tank By Phillip Ge Fall...

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