Lispector formal - "This revolution will happen only when all women are aware of their deplorable fate and of the rights they have lost in

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“This revolution will happen only when all women are aware of their deplorable fate, and of the rights they have lost in society” (De Gouges 88) “He want to command as a despot a sex which is in full possession of its intellectual faculties” (De Gouges 89) “The only limits on the exercise of the natural rights of woman are perpetual male tyranny” (De Gouges 90)
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Megan Lawless Com L 114 11/19/07 The Idea of Expectations in Lispector’s “The Imitation of the Rose” In Clarice Lispector’s “The Imitation of the Rose,” the protagonist Laura is struggling to keep her life on track. Feminists such as De Gouges suggest that men limit the rights of women and are therefore responsible for their unhappiness. To Laura, however, such things seem irrelevant. In this story, expectations are a recurring theme: Laura’s expectations of herself and those imposed on her by others. The true source of her distress, however, is not the expectations of her husband, friend, or doctor, but those she has of herself. She does not care about things like
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This note was uploaded on 03/10/2008 for the course COMM 114 taught by Professor Romero-rivera,marce during the Spring '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lispector formal - "This revolution will happen only when all women are aware of their deplorable fate and of the rights they have lost in

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