9 - Media I. The American Media II. Is the Press Biased?...

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Media I. The American Media II. Is the Press Biased? III. Journalistic Bias I. Why do we study the media? Looking at the history of the United States, free press isn’t hard to come by and by the U.S. having it shows much pride. An example of free press involves Richard Jules. The story by this involves a bomb present at the Atlanta Olympics and Richard Jules was a security guard present at the event. Somehow he found out about the bomb and immediately moved people away from the bomb and the media concluded he was a primary suspect for setting the bomb because his heroic act seemed misleading. He sued and won. Under free press, tabloids are included and it seems like an unlikely price to pay. Looking back to the times of the founding fathers, freedom press wasn’t as extended as it is today because printing was localized and partisan; you picked up a paper of a party you supported. An example included Adams and Jefferson. Adams was president and Federalist and Jefferson was part of the Democratic-Republican party. Adams was so tired of being attacked through the media personally by Jefferson and his party. The Alien In-sedition Acts were soon passed by Congress and created by Adams to end media attacks. A part of this act also conflicted with immigrants. The act was soon repealed in 1802.
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9 - Media I. The American Media II. Is the Press Biased?...

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