Lecture_1_-_Sponges_2008_-_4_slides

Lecture_1_-_Sponges_2008_-_4_slides - 1 EEMB 3:...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 EEMB 3: Introduction to the Animals: Sponges Lecture 1 May 16, 2008 Professor Hofmann Announcements Office hours: Marine Science Building, Room 2411 Mon 11am-12:30pm Wed 11am -12pm Or by appointment hofmann@lifesci.ucsb.edu Office: 893-6175 Outline of lecture will be posted asap, usually the afternoon before class Honors meeting: Friday, May 16th and May 30th in MSB Auditorium on May 30th @ 11am - 12pm Readings in Life Lecture 1: Sponges (CH. 31, pp. 670-684 Lecture 2: Cnidarians (pp. 685-689, for Monday, May 19) Goal of Lecture 1 What is an animal? What are the common ancestors? What traits do all animals share? Our first group: Sponges What characters distinguish animals from other organisms? Multicellular organisms but incredibly diverse. 2 Nutritional considerations: Heterotrophs Animals must consume organic compounds. Lack ability to make them from inorganic molecules. Digest internally, somehow (this is also highly variable in the animal kingdom) Feeding strategies Filter feeders Herbivores Predators Parasites Detritivores Some sort of motion is required to get the food Motion is relative Locomote to get food Move environment Sit and wait Energy is expended Locomotion & the need to find food has resulted in unique systems Sensory systems are unique as compared to plants, for example. Variety of sensory structures Nervous systems to process and coordinate the sensory information and organize a response. Behavior in this regard, animals are much more complex than plants 3 With all this variety, how do biologists describe the evolutionary relationships among the animals? First, lets look at what ALL animals share: Animals are descended from a single ancestral line Monophyletic Animal Evolutionary Relationships Phylogenies are estimates of relatedness Can be made with morphological data or with molecular data Many different approaches combined Simplest animals: Sponges, cnidarians,...
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Lecture_1_-_Sponges_2008_-_4_slides - 1 EEMB 3:...

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