Chapter_11 - Chapter 11 History of the Universe Knowing how...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 11 History of the Universe Knowing how the scale factor a ( t ) grew in the past, and predicting how it will behave in the future, is an important goal of cosmologists. The Friedmann equation tells us that the growth of the scale factor is related to the energy density of the universe. It is useful to divide the energy content into radiation (relativistic particles), matter (non-relativistic particles), and a cosmological constant. This is because each of these components has an energy density with a different dependence on the scale factor. A cosmological constant has an energy density u that is constant with time. To see how the energy density of radiation and matter behaves as the universe expands, consider a volume V that expands with the universe, so that V ( t ) a ( t ) 3 . If particles are neither created nor destroyed, then the number density of particles, n , is diluted by the expansion of the universe at the rate n ( t ) V ( t )- 1 a ( t )- 3 , as illustrated in Figure 11.1. The energy of the non-relativistic particles is contributed entirely by their rest mass, = mc 2 , which remains constant as the universe expands. Thus, for non- relativistic particles, alias matter, the energy density has the dependence u m ( t ) = n ( t ) = n ( t ) mc 2 a ( t )- 3 . (11.1) The energy of relativistic particles, such as photons, has the dependence ( t ) = hc/ ( t ) a ( t )- 1 . Thus, for relativistic particles, alias radiation, the energy density has the dependence u r ( t ) = n ( t ) ( t ) = n ( t ) hc/ ( t ) a ( t )- 4 . (11.2) Given the different rates of decrease for the energy density, we find that the total energy density u was contributed mainly by radiation at early times, 254 11.1. THE CONSENSUS MODEL 255 Figure 11.1: Dilution of non-relativistic particles (matter) and relativistic particles (radiation). when a 1 (Figure 11.2). In the language of cosmologists, the early uni- verse was radiation dominated. If the universe has a positive cosmological constant , then it becomes lambda dominated if it reaches a sufficiently large scale factor. 11.1 The Consensus Model In recent years, cosmologists (ordinary a contentious bunch) have found themselves approaching an approximate consensus on the curvature, con- tents, and age of the universe. The curvature is flat (or nearly so), implying that the energy density today is close to the critical density u u c, 5200 MeV m- 3 . To see how this energy density is allocated among the differ- ent components, lets do a census of the universe. Most of the energy density of photons is provided by the Cosmic Mi- crowave Background; although stars have been shining away for 13 Gyr, starlight still provides less than 10% of the total photon energy of the uni- verse....
View Full Document

Page1 / 28

Chapter_11 - Chapter 11 History of the Universe Knowing how...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online