Epipelagic Productivity - Primary Productivity Productivity...

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Primary Productivity
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Productivity • What is primary production? • Key Terms: • Gross Primary Production (gC/m 2 /yr) • Net Primary Production (gC/m 2 /yr) 6CO 2 + 6H 2 0 C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6O 2 sunlight nutrients
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Standing Crop Standing crop= total amount of organism’s biomass in a given volume of water at a given time Difference between factors tending to increase numbers of individuals (reproduction and growth) and factors tending to decrease biomass or numbers (death, sinking, transport out of the area) The relationship between standing crop and productivity depends on the turnover rate of newly created cells
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How is Primary Production Measured? This bottle will allow us to estimate net productivity. What information do we need to estimate gross productivity? 6CO 2 + 6H 2 0 C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6O 2 sunlight nutrients There is a direct relationship between the amount of CO 2 used and the amount of oxygen produced as a byproduct during carbon assimilation What happens to NPP if GPP = R?
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How is Primary Production Measured? SeaStar Spacecraft SeaWiFS Instrument Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor
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What Factors Limit Primary Production & Biomass? Photosynthetic autotrophs require 4 main ingredients to produce carbohydrates: water CO 2 sunlight inorganic nutrients Which of these factors are potentially limiting in marine systems? What other factors limit phytoplankton production?
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Light in the Ocean Water is not very transparent to light Most light striking the surface of the ocean at a low angle is reflected Light penetrating the ocean is selectively absorbed (which produces heat) and scattered by particulates
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Photopigments and Light Limitations Too much light can be limiting Too little light can be limiting The compensation point occurs at different depths depending on prevailing conditions. The depth at which photosynthesis = respiration is the compensation depth .
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