122ch10c_002

122ch10c_002 - 32 10.76) 33 10.76) (cont.) 10.78) 34 10.79)...

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32 10.76)
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33 10.76) (cont.) 10.78)
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34 10.79) Under these conditions this gas exhibits a negative deviation from ideality The intermolecular attractive forces reduce the effective number of particles and the real pressure. This is reasonable for 1 mole of gas at relatively low temp. and pressure. 10.82) 10.85)
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35 10.88) It is simplest to calculate the partial pressure of each gas as it expands into the total volume, then sum the partial pressures. Use Boyle’s Law to calculate the new pressures of each gas in the mixture after the expansion. The final vol is: V 2 = 1.0 L + 1.0 L + 0.5 L = 2.5 L 10.89) Use mole fraction to calculate moles of O 2 in air (n O 2 = P O 2 n air ).
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36 10.92) Calculate the average molar mass of the mixture of O 2 and Kr. Then relate the average molar mass to the molar masses of O 2 and Kr using mole fractions . Remember mole fractions add to 1.
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122ch10c_002 - 32 10.76) 33 10.76) (cont.) 10.78) 34 10.79)...

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