Chapter 8 - Global Communication Summary Chapter 8 Stakeholders of Multimedia Conglomerates Outside the United States Cultural Imperialism the United

Chapter 8 - Global Communication Summary Chapter 8...

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Global Communication Summary: Chapter 8- Stakeholders of Multimedia Conglomerates Outside the United States Cultural Imperialism: - the United States role in global media expansion, some of this criticism found its way into the rhetoric of UNESCO and in the 1980s and continues to be repeated by people promoting an anti-American agenda. the agenda seeks to re-ignite the support for HWICO and to promote a more equitable and balanced flow of media in the international arena. - global media empire, the media corporations are from various different interest and strategies, rather than promoting a simplistic New-York - Los Angeles plot captures the minds of unsuspecting foreigners. records, CDs, to movies, magazines, television, and the Internet there is a great global mix of ownership among the communication industry is going to increase and expand over time. - global stakeholders is the desire to make a profit by expanding their audience size and share. they seek more customers to generate greater profits in order to keep their respective senior management, owner and shareholders happy. - concerns about the possible effects of the mass media on individuals and cultures have been preoccupation of academic since WWII. - Most of the research focused on the impact of the media is developed core nations particularly the United States, Canada, and Europe. a small number of critical scholars began to examine the impact of the media on the developed peripheral nations and look at issues such as power, domination, economic determinism, and other variables. - “the made in America” label began to take on different meaning to different researchers. Herbert I. Schiller who focused in theoretical way on issues such as global ownership one- way flow of information, power, cultural aspects, and the impact of advertising. - In 1970s the literature on cultural imperialism began to look at other media systems as well, from records, tapes, video games, and television, to advertising and children’s paraphernalia. - The theory of cultural imperialism was gaining credence as a negative model of global relationships. The problem became a transnational issues rather than a purely Hollywood or “Made in America” one, as critics had contended for decades. - in 1980s, with the take-over of some Hollywood studios foreign corporation; the move of British, German, French, and Canadian companies into global cultural industries; and the entrance of then Australian-based News corporations into television and satellite businesses in North American, Europe, and Asia, a highly competitive global media marketplace began to develop.
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  • Winter '16
  • Helen Hambly
  • European Union, Global Communication, global media, major communication stakeholders

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