Ideal_Gas_Law_Lab - Title Ideal Gas Law and Gas Stoichiometry Lab Purpose To determine the percent yield of carbon dioxide gas produced by a chemical

Ideal_Gas_Law_Lab - Title Ideal Gas Law and Gas...

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Title: Ideal Gas Law and Gas Stoichiometry Lab Purpose: To determine the percent yield of carbon dioxide gas produced by a chemical reaction using the Ideal gas law. Introduction: In chemistry, calculations that relate quantities of substances are known as stoichiometry problems. Stoichiometry is a study of the quantitative or measurable relationships that exists in chemical formulas and chemical reactions. Solving stoichiometry problems involve interpreting a balanced chemical equation in terms of moles using coefficients. The coefficients in a balanced chemical equation represent the relative number of particles ( atoms, molecules, ions ,) involved in the reactions and the relative number of moles. In this experiment, baking soda will react with hydrochloric acid to yield a salt, water and carbon dioxide gas. The HCl acid is in excess in the reaction so that the moles of CO 2 gas produced may be determined from the moles of the NaHCO 3 that react. The gas laws you have learned such as Boyle’s, Charles, and Avogadro’s relate one of the four variables of P,V,T, and n to another variable. The proportionalities can be combined to derive an equation called the Ideal gas law , given by the equation PV = nRT . In the equation, P = gas pressure, V = gas volume, n = number of gas moles, T = Kelvin Temperature and R = a proportionality constant. The Ideal gas law equation describes the physical behavior of an ideal gas in terms of the above variables. An “ideal” gas follows the gas laws at all conditions of P and T. The particles of an ideal gas have no volume or size and there is no attraction between them. Ideal gases do not exist. However, at many conditions of moderate temperature and pressure real gases behave very much like ideal gases. Real gases differ most from an ideal gas at low temperatures and high pressures. During this experiment you will determine the number of moles of CO 2 gas formed during a chemical reaction using the ideal gas law. In addition, you will determine the percent yield of CO 2
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