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i Partners in Education: A Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family–School Partnerships A publication of SEDL in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education Partners Education in A Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family–School Partnerships
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2013 © Copyright by SEDL Funding for this publication is provided by the U.S. Department of Education, contract number ED-04-CO-0039/0001.
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1 Partners in Education: A Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family–School Partnerships My vision for family engagement is ambitious… I want to have too many parents demanding excellence in their schools. I want all parents to be real partners in education with their children’s teachers, from cradle to career. In this partnership, students and parents should feel connected—and teachers should feel supported. When parents demand change and better options for their children, they become the real accountability backstop for the educational system . —ARNE DUNCAN, U.S. SECRETARY OF EDUCATION, MAY 3, 2010
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3 Introduction ....................................................................................................... 5 The Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family–School Partnerships .................... 7 The Challenge ................................................................................................. 7 Opportunity Conditions ................................................................................... 9 Policy and Program Goals ............................................................................... 10 Staff and Family Partnership Outcomes ..................................................................................................... 11 The Three Case Studies ...................................................................................... 13 Stanton Elementary School .............................................................................. 13 Boston Public Schools .................................................................................... 16 First 5 Santa Clara County ............................................................................... 19 Conclusion and Recommendations ...................................................................... 25 Endnotes .......................................................................................................... 27 About the Authors ............................................................................................. 28 Table of Contents
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5 For schools and districts across the U.S., family engagement is rapidly shifting from a low-priority recommendation to an integral part of education reform efforts. or schools and districts across the U.S., fam- ily engagement 1 is rapidly shifting from a low-priority recommendation to an integral part of education reform efforts. Family engagement has long been enshrined in policy at the federal level through Title I of ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act), which requires that Title I schools develop parental involvement policies and “school– family compacts” that outline how the two stakeholder groups will work together to boost student achieve- ment. 2 State governments are increasingly adding their voices to the chorus. As of January 2010, 39 states and the District of Columbia had enacted laws calling for the implementation of family engagement policies. 3 In 2012, Massachusetts was one of several states to integrate family engagement into its educator evalu- ation system, making “family and community engage- ment” one of the four pillars of its rubric for evaluating teachers and administrators. 4 These policies are rooted in a wide body of research demonstrating the beneficial effects of parental involve- ment and family–school partnerships. Over 50 years of research links the various roles that families play in a child’s education—as supporters of learning, encour- agers of grit and determination, models of lifelong learning, and advocates of proper programming and placements for their child—with indicators of student achievement including student grades, achievement test
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  • Spring '14
  • EvelinaGuzauskyte
  • partner, Education reform, Student Voice

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