Everglades

Everglades - CERP flow STS034-088-022 Lake Okeechobee...

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Slight changes in elevation (only inches), water salinity, and soil create entirely different landscapes, each with its own community of plants and animals.
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STS034-088-022 Lake Okeechobee Basin, Florida, U.S.A. October 1989 Large cultivated sugarcane fields (rectangular patterns) are easily discriminated south and southeast of Lake Okeechobee. These flatlands in south-central Florida were part of Lake Okeechobee when it was much larger and produced an abundance of vegetation. As the shoreline receded to its present size, the decaying plants left a rich soil with a high humus content. Light, linear features extending south and southeast from the lake are part of a network of dikes and canals built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to transport water to the east coast. Part of the Arthur R. Marshall-Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is visible (right edge).
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Unformatted text preview: CERP flow STS034-088-022 Lake Okeechobee Basin, Florida, U.S.A. October 1989 Large cultivated sugarcane fields (rectangular patterns) are easily discriminated south and southeast of Lake Okeechobee. These flatlands in south-central Florida were part of Lake Okeechobee when it was much larger and produced an abundance of vegetation. As the shoreline receded to its present size, the decaying plants left a rich soil with a high humus content. Light, linear features extending south and southeast from the lake are part of a network of dikes and canals built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to transport water to the east coast. Part of the Arthur R. Marshall-Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is visible (right edge)....
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This note was uploaded on 07/17/2008 for the course GS 105 taught by Professor Leavell during the Winter '08 term at Ohio State.

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Everglades - CERP flow STS034-088-022 Lake Okeechobee...

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