Ch02_Outline

Ch02_Outline - Chapter 2 Plate Tectonics: A Scientific...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Chapter 2 Plate Tectonics: A Scientific Revolution Unfolds Continental drift: An idea before its time ± Alfred Wegener First proposed his continental drift hypothesis in 1915 Published The Origin of Continents and Oceans ± Continental drift hypothesis Supercontinent called Pangaea began breaking apart about 200 million years ago Pangaea approximately 200 million years ago Figure 2.2
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Continental drift: An idea before its time ± Continental drift hypothesis Continents "drifted" to present positions ± Evidence used in support of continental drift hypothesis Fit of the continents Fossil evidence Rock type and structural similarities Paleoclimatic evidence Matching mountain ranges Figure 2.6 Paleoclimatic evidence Figure 2.7
Background image of page 2
3 The great debate ± Objections to the continental drift hypothesis Lack of a mechanism for moving continents Wegener incorrectly suggested that continents broke through the ocean crust, much like ice breakers cut through ice Strong opposition to the hypothesis from all areas of the scientific community The great debate ± Continental drift and the scientific method Wegener’s hypothesis was correct in principle, but contained incorrect details A few scientists considered Wegener’s ideas plausible and continued the search Continental drift and paleomagnetism ± Renewed interest in continental drift initially came from rock magnetism ± Magnetized minerals in rocks Show the direction to Earth’s magnetic poles Provide a means of determining their latitude of origin
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Continental drift and paleomagnetism ± Polar wandering The apparent movement of the magnetic poles illustrated in magnetized rocks indicates that the continents have moved Indicates Europe was much closer to the equator when coal-producing swamps existed Continental drift and paleomagnetism ± Polar wandering Curves for North America and Europe have similar paths but are separated by about 24 ° of longitude Differences between the paths can be reconciled if the continents are placed next to one another Polar-wandering paths for Eurasia and North America Figure 2.11
Background image of page 4
5 A scientific revolution begins ± During the 1950s and 1960s technological
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/17/2008 for the course GS 121 taught by Professor Leavell during the Fall '07 term at Ohio State.

Page1 / 17

Ch02_Outline - Chapter 2 Plate Tectonics: A Scientific...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online